ACTIVE LISTENING BOOK

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The Art of Active Listening: How to Double Your Communication Skills in 30 Days to improve your active listening skills, then you have found the right book. Active Listening – The Forgotten Skill Listening is a skill forgotten by many, and this book is here to revive it. We will take you on a journey of discovery through. The author of this little page book suggests that Diogenes Laertius Active listening skills can have a hugely positive effect on your whole.


Active Listening Book

Author:HERB HALLGREN
Language:English, Dutch, Portuguese
Country:Netherlands
Genre:Lifestyle
Pages:568
Published (Last):10.10.2015
ISBN:691-9-33604-383-3
ePub File Size:30.50 MB
PDF File Size:18.42 MB
Distribution:Free* [*Registration Required]
Downloads:47648
Uploaded by: CARMA

Listening. Listening. Listening. I know how important it is, but I also know how hard I sometimes find to truly listen. I guess I'm not unique when I. Active Listening, Second Edition, is grounded in the theory that learners are more successful listeners when they activate their prior knowledge of a topic. Active. This FREE eBook explains the principles of active listening - download it now for your PC, laptop, Book Description - ISBN (30 Pages).

How to use reflection and clarification in the context of active listening. How to overcome the internal barriers to effective active listening. How to integrate different types of questioning into active listening. Today's Top Picks for Our Readers: Recommended by Gives you some great takeaways Communications skills are something that I know I can always use work on, so I picked out the 'Active Listening' title and gave it a read.

I am somewhat familiar with the concepts involved with active listening, but admittedly haven't thought about this topic in quite some time. Figuring it was time for a review, I was pleased to find that I learned quite a bit from this relatively short book. It is an easy read with plenty of illustrations, yet doesn't lack for meaningful content that I imagine a wide range of people will find useful.

It is my opinion that the skill of listening in general has taken a significant hit since the popularity of devices like smart phones and tablets took off a few years ago.

Many conversations now take place with one or both people staring down at their screen while trying to 'listen'. The result is that many conversations are useless, forgotten, and a waste of time. This book on active listening is a great reminder that listening to the other person speak in a conversation is important and a skill all its own.

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I am certainly guilty of distracted listening myself, and hope to be better about it in the future. One of the interesting distinctions that was made in this book regarding the practice of active listening was pointing out that it is important to not form opinions or judgments early in the conversation. I have always thought about active listening in terms of simply paying attention to what the other person is saying, but there is more to it than that.

By giving them time to make all of their points, without interruption or early judgment, you can actually hear what they have to say before offering your two cents.

Being an impatient person, I know that I have cut people off in the past, assuming I knew what they were going to say. The book points out how that can be a mistake, and I think they are correct with that conclusion.

Another section of this book that I found to be useful was the discussion of questioning skills. I sometimes find it difficult to ask questions in a business conversation without feeling like I am trying to take over or dominate the conversation.

One of the mistakes I have likely made is that of asking closed questions, which this book points out. Questions that only have a 'yes' or 'no' answer tend to hurt the conversation and lead to one person doing most of the talking.

I will try to avoid using these questions in the workplace to encourage more collaboration. The section toward the later stages of this book on nonverbal cues hit home for me as I have a habit of standing with my arms crossed. This isn't intended to be a signal to the person that I am speaking with, but I can now see how I could appear tense or standoffish when taking this posture.

If I can remember to do it, I am going to try and stand in a way that appears more relaxed and open. I would be happy to recommend this guide on active listening because it contains a nice collection of solid advice on the topic without getting too dry or technical. It is long enough to give you some great takeaways that you can put into your everyday work life, but short enough to read in one sitting. If you are interested in improving your overall communication skills to hopefully perform better in the workplace, take a few moments and brush up on active listening.

Gerard Cohen Could help you become a better manager Right off the bat, the book describes exactly what active listening is. It turns out there is a lot more that goes into listening than I had previously thought. There are three different degrees of active listening. The three types are repeating, paraphrasing, and reflecting. I like that a chart is included in the book so that it easily lays out the similarities and differences between the three degrees.

The chart made it very easy to understand the differences. Active listening involves giving the speaker your undivided attention.

There are seven different types of question you can use: Chapter 5 - Barriers to Active Listening There are many barriers to active listening, including physical and cultural factors such as a noisy environment, a strong regional accent, or a difference in terms of reference. There are also barriers that you can create yourself if you are not careful.

These include: Chapter 6 - Advantages of Active Listening The elements of listening orientation empathy, acceptance, congruence, and concreteness are likely to increase as the reflective listening process continues.

These are the ingredients you need for an open, trusting relationship with your team members. Active Listening Tips - Good listeners' detach themselves from their own concerns, attitudes, and ideas whilst they are listening. You achieve this by removing such distractions allowing you to observe both the conscious and unconscious signs of the speaker. You are then able to identify any discrepancies between these two signs and discern the true meaning of what has been said.

21 Resources to Become a Better Listener

Gives you some great takeaways Communications skills are something that I know I can always use work on, so I picked out the 'Active Listening' title and gave it a read. I am somewhat familiar with the concepts involved with active listening, but admittedly haven't thought about this topic in quite some time.

Figuring it was time for a review, I was pleased to find that I learned quite a bit from this relatively short book. It is an easy read with plenty of illustrations, yet doesn't lack for meaningful content that I imagine a wide range of people will find useful.

It is my opinion that the skill of listening in general has taken a significant hit since the popularity of devices like smart phones and tablets took off a few years ago. Many conversations now take place with one or both people staring down at their screen while trying to 'listen'.

The result is that many conversations are useless, forgotten, and a waste of time.

This book on active listening is a great reminder that listening to the other person speak in a conversation is important and a skill all its own. I am certainly guilty of distracted listening myself, and hope to be better about it in the future.

One of the interesting distinctions that was made in this book regarding the practice of active listening was pointing out that it is important to not form opinions or judgments early in the conversation.

I have always thought about active listening in terms of simply paying attention to what the other person is saying, but there is more to it than that. By giving them time to make all of their points, without interruption or early judgment, you can actually hear what they have to say before offering your two cents.

Being an impatient person, I know that I have cut people off in the past, assuming I knew what they were going to say. The book points out how that can be a mistake, and I think they are correct with that conclusion. Another section of this book that I found to be useful was the discussion of questioning skills. I sometimes find it difficult to ask questions in a business conversation without feeling like I am trying to take over or dominate the conversation.

One of the mistakes I have likely made is that of asking closed questions, which this book points out. Questions that only have a 'yes' or 'no' answer tend to hurt the conversation and lead to one person doing most of the talking. I will try to avoid using these questions in the workplace to encourage more collaboration.

Communication

The section toward the later stages of this book on nonverbal cues hit home for me as I have a habit of standing with my arms crossed. This isn't intended to be a signal to the person that I am speaking with, but I can now see how I could appear tense or standoffish when taking this posture.

If I can remember to do it, I am going to try and stand in a way that appears more relaxed and open. I would be happy to recommend this guide on active listening because it contains a nice collection of solid advice on the topic without getting too dry or technical.

It is long enough to give you some great takeaways that you can put into your everyday work life, but short enough to read in one sitting. If you are interested in improving your overall communication skills to hopefully perform better in the workplace, take a few moments and brush up on active listening. Gerard Cohen. Could help you become a better manager Right off the bat, the book describes exactly what active listening is. It turns out there is a lot more that goes into listening than I had previously thought.

There are three different degrees of active listening. The three types are repeating, paraphrasing, and reflecting. I like that a chart is included in the book so that it easily lays out the similarities and differences between the three degrees. The chart made it very easy to understand the differences. Active listening involves giving the speaker your undivided attention. This book gives a list of tips that helps you become a better listener.

The book states that being a good active listener could help you to be a better manager.Error rating book.

This isn't intended to be a signal to the person that I am speaking with, but I can now see how I could appear tense or standoffish when taking this posture. This book is not yet featured on Listopia. Listening: The Forgotten Skill — A self-teaching guide for turning effective listening into a powerful tool.

Return to Book Page. It's a quick read but it's packed with the essentials to spark your brain to develop the skills of listening.