ART OF DECEPTION EBOOK

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Social Engineering uses influence and persuasion to deceive people The Art of Deception shows how vulnerable we all are - government, business, and each . The Art of Deception: Controlling the Human Element of Security by Kevin D. Mitnick. Read online, or download in secure PDF or secure EPUB format. Now, in The Art of Deception, the world's most notorious hacker gives new meaning to the old adage, "It takes a thief to catch a thief." Focusing.


Art Of Deception Ebook

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The worlds most infamous hacker offers an insiders view of thelow-tech threats to high-tech security Kevin Mitnicks exploits as a cyber-desperado and fugitive. THE ART OF DECEPTION. Controlling the Human Element of Security. KEVIN D. MITNICK. & William L. Simon. Foreword by Steve Wozniak. Scanned by. Editorial Reviews. kaz-news.info Review. The Art of Deception is about gaining someone's trust Kindle Store; ›; Kindle eBooks; ›; Business & Money.

Recensie s Retail Systems, December Publishing News, 26 July required reading for IT professionals, [and] is highly recommended for public, academic, and corporate libraries. Library Journal, August This is Mitnick's account, complete with advice for how to protect yourself from similar attacks. I believe his story. Wired, October does deliver on 'social engineering' exercises.

And [o]ne way or another, you'll find the information useful. Red Herring, October Mitnick outlines dozens of social engineering scenarios in his book, dissecting the ways attackers can easily exploit what he describes as 'that natural human desire to help others and be a good team player. Forbes, October 14, CNN, 16 October I willingly recommend The Art of Deception. It could save you from embarrassment or an even worse fate BBC online, 14 October Forbes, 2 October The Independent, 21 October Information Age, October Mitnick has done an effective job of showing exactly what the greatest threat of attack is - people and their human nature Unix Review, 18 October Fraud Watch, Vol.

Business a. I would expect to see it as required reading on courses that cover business security Should you read this book? On several levels the answer has to be yes. If you run your own business, work in one, or just want a good read, this is worth it Acorn User, 29 October ITWeek, 1 November IT Week, 4 November Mitnick has a laid-back style which makes the book easy to read and of great interest, even to those of us who have no interest in computers Business Age, September New Scientist, 23 November New Media Age, 14 November Information Security Management, November His new book, The Art of Deception, presents itself as a manual to help companies defeat hackers Also listed in recommended reading list The Guardian, 13 December MacFormat, January Business Week, 8 January Focus, February Telecomworldwire, 4 February Technology and Society, 7 February Business Week, 3 September Electronic Commerce Guide, 12 February Computer Business Review, 6 March Managing Information, March Aberdeen Evening Express, 7 June Accounting Web, 19 June M2 Best Books, 4 February Managing Information - 5 star rating, October Lees de eerste pagina's.

Reviews Schrijf een review. BHollywood 14 juli Ik raad dit product aan. Geschreven bij The Art of Deception Alhoewel het boek al wat jaren oud is, denk ik dat er nog niets veranderd is - "there's a sucker born every minute" zei iemand ooit eens. Vond je dit een nuttige review? Geschreven bij The Art of Deception geweldig boek, er gaan deuren voor je open waarvan je niet eens wist dat ze bestonden. Yomba Rotterdam 4 januari Ik raad dit product aan. Geschreven bij The Art of Deception Bij gebrek aan een goed nederlands woord: We think of computer hackers as sitting in an isolated room, endlessly probing corporate and private networks from their screen.

Actually, almost all deep hacking starts with the manipulation of people to do something that allows the hacker to move to the next level. The Art of Deception tells how Mitnick used "social engineering" skills to get people to unknowingly provide critical assistance, from simply being polite and opening a secure door to setting up restricted user accounts. Having read We think of computer hackers as sitting in an isolated room, endlessly probing corporate and private networks from their screen.

Having read this book, I am much more suspicious of any request made online, by phone, or in person by a stranger. Should be required reading for anyone in IT, especially those involved in network security. Das Telefon in der Buchhandlung klingelt. Du, hier ist etwas ziemlich schief gelaufen und der Kunde tobt. Er hat auch schon bezahlt und braucht es dringend jetzt. Er holt es gleich ab.

Gib es ihm einfach mit, ok? Und das einfach, indem jemand danach gefragt hat. Der Vater geht relativ lax mit seinen Kreditkartenangaben um.

Innerhalb von 10 Minuten. Top, die Wette gilt. Alles, in dem er einfach danach gefragt hat. Also von Orten, an denen man mit einer hohen Anforderung an die Sicherheit rechnet. Auch ich habe schon arglos Informationen weitergegeben. Dies wird nun nicht mehr vorkommen. Niemand geht davon aus, dass der freundliche Herr am Telefon, der so sehr in der Misere steckt, gar nicht der ist, der er zu sein scheint.

Es geht dabei nicht um Informationen wie "wo finde ich die Post? Vorsicht ist geboten! Etwas herunterladen? Lieber erst vergewissern, dass man wirklich mit jemandem aus der IT spricht! Oct 26, James rated it liked it.

Interesting read. Social engineering has been going on a long time and has impacted many corporations, governments, etc. I felt this book did a great job documenting examples of what has taken place as well as provided insights for what you and your organization can do to help prevent, the best that you can, social engineering attacks. This book definitely irritated me as I had not thought about the detailed level of attacks folks have gone through.

Thinking back, there have probably been So Thinking back, there have probably been some times where I had been the person on the receiving end. Wish I had read this about a decade ago as it has some good common sense knowledge to learn from.

Apr 08, Gwanderson rated it really liked it. Human's are like bad Microsoft coding. Mar 04, Remo rated it really liked it Shelves: Jun 22, Khalid rated it liked it Shelves: Social Engineering. Social engineering is the term used in computer security to describe the manipulation of humans in order to break through a security barrier, and is sometimes referred to as hacking the mind.

In the first chapter of his book, usually referred to as The Lost Chapter As it wasn't published with the final version of the book , Kevin Mitnick tries to convince his readers that he is innocent — or at least In The Art of Deception , [Kevin Mitnick] discusses the thing he's best at: In the first chapter of his book, usually referred to as The Lost Chapter As it wasn't published with the final version of the book , Kevin Mitnick tries to convince his readers that he is innocent — or at least that he isn't a "criminal".

I believe he made good points in this chapter, and wish it was published. The book isn't about Mitnick, though; it's about social engineering. If he was ever on the dark side, he is no longer there.

He now works as a security consultant, and this book is designed to help improve security awareness, and help us all avoid being deceived by social engineers.

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The bulk of this book consists of different stories of social engineers getting their job done, followed by advice on how to avoid such kinds of attacks. Just like any security book, this book can also help the bad guys improve their skills, because it offers many ideas on how you can trick people; however, if the good guys read the book, they would laugh at the bad guys' attempts and say "Ha, I know that one! The idea of the book is very interesting, and some of its stories are really smart; however, I must admit that it gets a bit repetitive towards the end.

The authors are trying to separate different stories into different chapters, but the differences between the ideas in these stories are sometimes so small.

The ideas represented in this book are applicable to more than just computer-related systems Hey, you don't have to use them to steal money, but they're good to know anyway! But anyway, as long as you use a computer, you'll most likely be fine reading it! The authors have just completed a new book, The Art of Intrusion. It looks like it is going to be more technical, and more geared toward hacking than social engineering. I probably will give it a try sometime.

Jan 31, Koen Crolla rated it liked it Shelves: Almost all of this book consists of infinitesimal variations on the same point, communicated through accounts of apparently real events fictionalised by someone who clearly desperately wanted to write short stories instead of ghost-writing for minor celebrities but couldn't find a publisher for them.

That every story reads like a bad and I mean bad noir film isn't just annoying; it makes them much less credible. It's clear that Mitnick thinks very highly of himself and his accomplishments, occa Almost all of this book consists of infinitesimal variations on the same point, communicated through accounts of apparently real events fictionalised by someone who clearly desperately wanted to write short stories instead of ghost-writing for minor celebrities but couldn't find a publisher for them.

It's clear that Mitnick thinks very highly of himself and his accomplishments, occasionally remembering to point out that it's really easy to defend against social engineering attacks but mostly painting social engineers as omnipotent Supermen who are just better than the common folk who merely work in offices; he also seems to think he's the first person to write a book about defending against these con men, judging by his two chapters of condescending policy recommendations.

Maybe he is, to a lot of the people who'd read this book.

It's certainly likely that The Art of Deception has done and will continue to do more good than harm, which is more than can be said for most popular books on any kind of security. That doesn't make it any less repetitive, though. Jan 22, Son Tung rated it really liked it. Mitnick - a former hacker turned security expert - gives an excellent view on security threats posed by human factor in modern world. The common sense that computer geeks are often fat, unpopular with heavy glasses and nerdy faces is not applicable in "Social Engineer" category.

Social engineer is someone with talent and understanding for both social behavior and technical command. The funny parts are, sometimes the job can be done by curious individuals or dumpster scavengers. Imagine the work done by industrial spies to create heavy impact spionage! You will find dialogs which so amazingly similar with those in heist movies. Yep, it is real and complex. It was an enjoyable read for me, some parts are repetitive, i felt like a voice of an old, experienced man keeps echoing: Its all about human, not about fancy technology or machine.

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Lupo rated it really liked it. Kevin Mitnick is probably best known for being a phone phreak and fugitive computer hacker in the lates and early 90s, who was the focus of a considerable manhunt. Following his capture and time in prison, he's become an Internet security consultant and turned his talents to helping people avoid the sort of hacks he became famous for perpetrating.

This book is a chronicle of numerous social engineering attacks, some hypothetical, some based on real-world examples which may or may not have be Kevin Mitnick is probably best known for being a phone phreak and fugitive computer hacker in the lates and early 90s, who was the focus of a considerable manhunt.

This book is a chronicle of numerous social engineering attacks, some hypothetical, some based on real-world examples which may or may not have been carried out by Mitnick himself and recommendations for how to guard against such attacks. I actually recognize a number of the policies he recommends as being part of the security awareness my company conducts every year for employees, so apparently, someone listened.

I must admit I found the anecdotes more interesting than the policy recommendations, though someone tasked with guarding his or her companies assets would no doubt find these of immense value. Definitely worth a read. Mar 29, Russell rated it liked it.

I found the most valuable sections in this book to be the policy recommendations and information security practices described in the last chapters despite their age. I'll probably download this book simply because of the security policy information and the easy-to-understand business cases that are easily comprehendible due to their storylike nature.

Zzzzzzzzzz, Oh sorry This was a tough read. Very dry and if you've ever worked in a corporate environment, or IT at all, most of this is simply common sense. Some of the 'examples' used are repeated in Kevin's other book, Ghost in the Wires, which I read before this one.

GitW is a good read, this one, not so much Jul 07, Stefan rated it it was ok. While the book demonstrates the basic concept of social engineering quite well, it would never have got so much attention if Mitnick's name wasn't on the cover. It's okay, but it's not extraordinary.

Nov 01, James rated it liked it. This one had been sitting on my shelf for a loooong time. As a nerdy kid growing up I was fascinated by computers and the then-emerging Internet.

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I remember stumbling onto the "Anarchist Cookbook", and finding a few issues of the hacker magazine at a Barnes and Noble. The checkout lady gave me a concerned frown and told me to be careful. Haha, joke was on her! I had no idea what I was reading. Except for the parts about Kevin Mitnick, This one had been sitting on my shelf for a loooong time.

Except for the parts about Kevin Mitnick, the world's greatest hacker. There was apparently some big "Free Kevin! Except he never hurt anyone or truly damaged or broke anything, he just got caught having fun digitally trespassing.

Mitnick. The Art Of Deception

The day came when he was finally released from prison, and I remember gleefully watching him on ZNet TV on an episode of the Screensaver's being allowed to access the Internet for the first time. This was the ultimate "We did it Reddit!

When I recently had to take an online training class at work about social engineers trying to trick you into giving up valuable proprietary information, there were cute little video segments featuring my old friend Kevin. Holy crap! That guy! My old hero! I changed my AIM status to support you!

Oh wait, I bought your first book when it came out and I never read it! Let's do this! I regret that I did not read it then. While a lot of the information it provides is still quite valuable and true, it's almost commonplace in any workplace setting these days.

That's not to say social engineers have given up and hung up their hats, it's likely more prevalent than ever, but this is the Social Engineering book for people taking the on-ramp to the Information Superhighway for the very first time in the early s.

It features advice in there like don't keep your passwords written down next to locked computers there are a few X-Files episodes where Mulder and Scully can be thankful the monsters they were investigating didn't read this book , make those passwords a little more secure by being longer than 8 characters, don't let someone convince you to attach a dial-up modem to your computer or network, and don't set your modem to auto-answer lest a bored Matthew Broderick finds it. The main point behind this book is still very true today: It doesn't matter how sophisticated your technologically amazing security systems are, gullible super-friendly happy-to-help human beings are always your weakest link.

I'm convinced that if the Chinese have any engineering blueprints of our latest warfighters, they probably got it from having a young-looking spy with a goofy grin pretend to need help writing a book report.

But it's less embarrassing to blame faceless hackers. The best parts of the book were the little story vignettes that demonstrated how a person can make a few seemingly innocent phone calls asking for tidbits of information that lead to the mother-load. The first call could be person pretending to be a customer needing some advice. The next phone call could be to the receptionist with that little bit of gained knowledge to sound like an employee at another location.

That receptionist will provide information that a manager could use, and suddenly Gary in accounting needs to send over the latest financial projections STAT. Fax would work best, e-mail has been acting weird. I especially enjoyed the story about how young Kevin and a friend of his in high school went to a tech convention and managed to thwart a super-secure system in development.

Not through hacking so much as waiting for the employees to all leave the system un-attended during lunch, sweet-talking a promoter, using slight of hand and lock-picking a cabinet, and switching around some network cables. Kind of silly to build the vault door out of titanium if the surrounding walls are made from cardboard.

The last chunk of the book is just lists and simple paragraphs of kind of boring now-cliche advice that those working in security should know by heart. It becomes an undergrad textbook, basically.

I say all of this but find myself wanting to read the other books Kevin's since published as I'm sure he's got a wealth of ideas and knowledge about what social engineers might be up to today. And it's when you don't think you can be fooled is when you are most likely to be.

Jun 19, YHC rated it really liked it. I started to read this book last night and turned sleepless due to some similarity that i have encountered in the morning. A mail came to my email box saying someone in Ukraine using my email address to sign in a so called Gaijin.

We were not able to determine whether the previous login to I started to read this book last night and turned sleepless due to some similarity that i have encountered in the morning. We were not able to determine whether the previous login to the system was performed using this device or application.

Maybe you did it using a new computer, phone or browser. If you did not perform such actions, then there is a high possibility that your account has been hacked. Please read this article. The message is generated automatically and does not require a response.

Unsubscribe from these notifications " I actually went to check out, according to their instruction that if i didn't create an account i should block it.

It asked me to verify with my real email address even I needed to key in my password. I stopped there, didn't go on. Why should i hand in my password of mail address to some hackers just like that, but it really happens to everyone that under panic we would actually just react without thinking. In the era of technology, we are easily to become the victims of hackers. I am so fed up with credit cards hacking coz saw many people sharing this experience and find it ruins your good mood specially while you travel.

With some technique of psychology, doing favors, human networking, they get their target easily. We all need to be careful! Aug 20, Stephen rated it liked it Shelves: Interesting at first, but very repetitive. Mitnick, who claims his career as a hacker was passed solely on manipulating people to gain information and access, shares stories of others who did the same. These mostly include private investigators, with at least one pair of curious teenagers and a few bits of corporate espionage.

The modus operandi in all the cases is very similar: Information is solicited under false pretense from various people, then combined to gain further access or the answers. Mitnick refers to this as social engineering, and it's obvious from his collection that a high degree of charisma is required to gain the trust or goodwill of subjects; Mitnick also points out how the actors manipulate the people they're interacting with, pushing buttons for sympathy and fear. There are very few cases included here of people working in person; the simplest case involved a man studying a business to find out when the office staff left, and when the janitors arrived.

He then approached the place in a suit and briefcase, and pretended to be an office worker who needed to run in and get a few things from his office -- allowing him free run of the place. Mitnick ends each section, and the book in total, with advice on how to secure and compartmentalize information so employees don't accidentally give the farm away.

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This includes strict policies and training to control the flow of information, emphasizing the need to verify the identity and need of people requesting information. Given Mitnick's background as a hacker, there is necessarily a slight technologi Note: Given Mitnick's background as a hacker, there is necessarily a slight technological bent, but many of the cons hardly require any technology more complicated than a phone call.

The sections on possible social engineering techniques are very illuminating and pretty entertaining. They're a good illustration of how unsuspecting victims can easily be duped into giving up information and how that information can snowball into stealing something truly valuable or damaging.

Many of the technological sections of the book read a little bit outdated. Employees can and should have their own 2-factor tokens, making a companywide shared secret somewhat obsolete.

The common consensus is that passwords should not be required to change every 30 days. I'm not aware of any company that uses anonymous FTP servers to share data.

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Nevertheless, one can easily look past these sorts of things the book is nearly old enough to vote at this point , since the technology isn't the main point. Overall, the book is a compelling and educational read.

I'm not about to start recommending it to anyone and it's not the most thrilling of reads but you'll probably be better off for having read it. Mar 03, John rated it liked it. This had been on my to read shelf for quite some time so happy to finally give it a read.In this security-conscious era, we spend huge sums on technology to protect our computer networks and data.

Definitely worth a read. While I always enjoy Ray Porter as a narrator, the content of this book probably would lend itself better to print format if you want to use all of the tool I enjoyed Kevin's Ghost in the Wires, so I picked this one up; I was not disappointed.

Social engineer is someone with talent and understanding for both social behavior and technical command. While a lot of the information it provides is still quite valuable and true, it's almost commonplace in any workplace setting these days. Details if other: The Art of Deception: Kevin Mitnick The Art of Invisibility 9, Steve Wozniak Foreword.

Geschreven bij The Art of Deception geweldig boek, er gaan deuren voor je open waarvan je niet eens wist dat ze bestonden.

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