CHELY WRIGHT LIKE ME PDF

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pdf] like me confessions of a heartland country singer chely wright on sitecom free shipping on qualifying offers chely wright singer like me confessions of. Like Me: Confessions of a Heartland Country Singer. Home · Like Me: Confessions of a Heartland Country Singer Author: Chely Wright A Killer Like Me. Like Me Confessions Of A Heartland Country Singer Chely Wright the complete pdf book library. it's free to register here to get book file pdf like me confessions.


Chely Wright Like Me Pdf

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Like Me book. Read reviews from the world's largest community for readers. Chely Wright, singer, songwriter, country music star, writes in this movin. ebook by chely wright like me: confessions of a heartland country singer in pdf form, then you've come to the faithful site. what is it like to hear confessions?. Like Me Confessions Of A Heartland Country Singer By Chely Wright Wright's first Top 40 country hit came in with "Shut Up and Pdf Mitsubishi Pajero Sport Manual Oxford English For Careers Medicine 1 Teachers.

In coming out I had a feeling that it would diminish my wage earning, and that feeling was correct. And, I am fine with that". She had her first same-sex experience at age 19 — "it was the first time I'd ever had a girl's body pressed against mine" [24] —and the affair lasted the better part of a year. From to about , Wright maintained a committed relationship with a woman she described as "the love of my life", a woman she met shortly after winning her first recording contract.

The era of their relationship overlaps Wright's rise to chart-topping stardom. They maintained their relationship even though her partner subsequently married a man, and even while both women briefly had heterosexual relationships.

During their final five years they lived together, the relationship suffered numerous breakups and reconciliations due to the strain of being closeted, [25] the fact that "neither one of us thought it was acceptable to be in a gay relationship", [26] and Wright's prolonged absences while performing on tour nationally and internationally.

In the last months of , Wright began a relationship with country singer Brad Paisley. I loved Brad. I had no business being in a relationship with him". I'm not satisfied with that word. I am gay, and I am not seeking to be "tolerated". One tolerates a toothache, rush-hour traffic, an annoying neighbor with a cluttered yard. I am not a negative to be tolerated. It was not until that she decided to come out publicly, but spent the next three years writing her autobiography.

She stated that she wanted to come out to free herself from the burdens of living a lie, to lend support to gay children and teenagers, and to counter the belief that gays are wicked and defective. On May 3, , People Magazine reported her coming out. The couple married on August 20, , in a private ceremony on a country estate in Connecticut officiated by both a rabbi and a reverend.

A documentary film about Wright's extended coming out, entitled Wish Me Away , was released in The film shares its title with one of the tracks on her album, Lifted Off the Ground. Wright was named one of Out magazine's annual People of the Year. I have, however, and I get it. I really do. I just wanted to hug her throughout this entire memoir and even knowing she's now happily married to a woman who makes her happy, I still just wanted to reach through each page and reassure her that it would be alright.

Readers will also find some fascinating anecdotes from Wright's extensive tours for the U. Her devotion to the troops is well documented and by all accounts very much appreciated.

The stories she shares in Like Me are as warm as they can be funny or heartbreaking, and this is just as true of her military tales. Chely Wright is a complex though, I don't think, complicated woman. She balks at those who invoke the Bible to crusade against the LGBT community, but will not apologize for her own faith. Some liberal readers may be upset that she continues to be conservative in many key parts of her life; some conservative readers will, of course, have their own obvious qualms with her.

I think in this, above all else, she epitomizes modern day America. Jul 19, Niki rated it it was amazing. Whether you are a star in Nashville, or a waitress making ends meet in Anytown; straight, gay, or uncertain This is not a book about being gay, being an entertainer, or coming out of the closet.

This is a book about one person's struggle with all of life's complexities, and what she needed to do to be able to live her life to its fullest.

She touches Whether you are a star in Nashville, or a waitress making ends meet in Anytown; straight, gay, or uncertain She touches in great detail on many moments of her life that have clearly shaped her and made her the woman she is today. Chely has a gift in sharing herself and her experiences without preaching or judging, and leaves the reader with feelings of hope and inspiration, even while explaining some of her darkest moments.

Though she has worked tirelessly to achieve success in her career, and therefore become famous, you'll find yourself reading along as though she's your dear friend, confiding in you her innermost struggles. And you'll be compelled to support her, as a person, regardless of your views and beliefs of homosexuality. She has this effect because her pages are genuine, sincere, and let you in to her heart and her human experience.

This book would be a helpful read to any person, as it shares the struggles of another, another point of view. But I would definitely recommend it to any person who feels strongly against homosexuality, especially because of religious beliefs. It would be unfair to stand your ground in your beliefs without educating yourself on the whole picture, and Chely Wright's story offers an intelligent view of how one's spirit can be broken by those who chose to stand against you, without ever understanding you.

Feb 23, Alo Evans rated it liked it. As many other reviewers will no doubt have already said, this was a pretty good story which was not really written all that well.

It was interesting and very simply written, which made it easy to geth through. However, there were so many instances which made me think that she really could have used the help of someone who has written memoirs before.

There was a lack of continuity through the whole book. There was little order, chronological or otherwise. Oftentimes, chapters were 2 or 3 pages lo As many other reviewers will no doubt have already said, this was a pretty good story which was not really written all that well.

Oftentimes, chapters were 2 or 3 pages long and were situated between two seemingly irrelevant chapters. Part of the reason that I might be so hard on this book is the fact that I was simultaneously reading ME by Ricky Martin, which from at least a literary standpoint was vastly superior. I actually had to focus only on this book to stop the comparison of style, but he'll get his own review.

Still, her words carried a lot of weight from their sheer honesty, which made the book deserving of the 3 stars. I believe this could have been a 5-star book, though, and that makes this disappointing. I am glad that she wrote it, I am glad that I read it and I am glad that she is out. I know that her words will serve as a source of support to the many people who have or are going through difficulties like this.

Nov 27, Spider the Doof Warrior rated it it was amazing.

I thought she was very cute. Turns out she is a lesbian country music musician which probably, judging by reading this book isn't easy.

She visits soldiers in war torn parts of the world and entertains them and signs stuff for them. She seems like a genuinely nice person. But there are people who would hate her ONLY for being a lesbian. How does that make sense? People put dead cats in their mailboxes. I don't know if i knew what a lesbian even was, I just thought being so mean to such kind women, while the ministers preached hatred against them and probably weren't even trying to help the poor was so unjust.

Chely open and honestly talks about her being a lesbian and the guilt and pain she felt having to hide that from the world. Why should she even feel that?

All she wanted was the love of another woman. Why is that so terrible? There are people who would turn against her just for wanting to be herself but I support her totally and not just because I'm queer myself.

But I thought her parents were sometimes very mean to her brother and sister. Beating up a child to toughen them up is mean and so is dragging the sister behind a car to get her to lose weight.

But really Chely Wright is the nice girl next door, as American as apple pie who is also a lesbian. Hopefully she is very happy with her life because she deserves it after all she went through.

Book Marks: Like Me, The Lost Library, One Bloody Thing After Another

I've followed Chely's career in country music pretty much since the beginning. She's always been one of my favorites. And now, reading this book, my admiration for her has only grown. She is truly an amazing human being. It's hard to believe this is a first book Much love for this book and the woman who wrote it. Nov 20, Andrea rated it it was amazing Shelves: So I love autobiographies and memoirs, especially those that get down to the nitty gritty of one's thoughts and experiences.

I heard about Chely Wright's book when I saw a clip of her on Oprah "coming out" to her and was intrigued. She dated and slept with fellow male country singers particularly Brad Paisley who is quite attractive , so her story was quite intriguing to me. I am not a fan nor did I know much about her other than she was a country music singer and dated fellow male country musi So I love autobiographies and memoirs, especially those that get down to the nitty gritty of one's thoughts and experiences.

I am not a fan nor did I know much about her other than she was a country music singer and dated fellow male country music singers. Her story did not disappoint. From her early childhood, where she literally tries to pray away the gay and fails to her very vivid description on how she really played games with Brad Paisley's heart all because she was a lesbian and couldn't tell him were interesting to say the least there is one part in particular I was just like OMG!

I won't spoil it for those who will read it, but just wow. Her description of the love of her life and the loss of her because of her hiding was very moving. She seems even with coming out, a touch lost and unhappy and I hope she find true peace within herself. Coming out at what in her late 30's must have been HUGE.

I cannot relate to this in any way, but I felt for her nonetheless, since she grew up in a rural small town, it must have been extremely difficult for her.

And the abuse they showed her sister for being fat was truly horrifyingnever heard of such abuse and I must say, her parents look atrocious now. Her mother's description with her new boyfriend hit a bit too close to home with the way she was towards her daughter.

I highly recommend this autobiography for those interested in someone who led a very secretive life for a very long time period or anyone who is intrigued like me or is a fan or is gay and afraid to reveal themselves. Her words were simplistic at times, but still moving nonetheless.

This woman has been through some true pain and soul searching. The lesson I took was know yourself and don't be afraid to show the world who you truly are easier said then done for her but nonetheless. I hope she helps others like she said she wanted to at the end.

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Jan 08, Brenda rated it did not like it. I am not a fan of autobiographical material in the first place and this hasn't helped my opinion. I felt the book was choppy and self indulgent. I got the topic very clearly after the first chapter, so I don't understand why she's still whacking me over the head with it by using the word "gay" times per page thereafter.

I think that if one was really concerned about how much they "damaged" another person by the lies one told, we wouldn't then follow it up by naming them in a memoir and throw I am not a fan of autobiographical material in the first place and this hasn't helped my opinion.

I think that if one was really concerned about how much they "damaged" another person by the lies one told, we wouldn't then follow it up by naming them in a memoir and throwing them under the bus for book sales.

She could have said she dated someone and left it at that Furthermore, I find the notion that she's been frozen out by the music industry since coming out laughable. Little Mermaid 2 was released straight to video in like I think maybe the music industry is less than impressed with her throwing people who displease her under the literary bus and not so much concerned with whom she chooses to sleep. Used to be a fan, always wondered why she disappeared from the music scene, but she's far from the only one hit wonder out there View all 7 comments.

May 06, Jim rated it really liked it Shelves: Aug 31, Katie rated it it was ok Shelves: This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This is more of a hiding-out story than a coming-out story. Wright details her climb to Nashville success from her heartland roots in Kansas, and the secret that caused her pain and ultimately cost her the career she had so hard worked for.

Her religious and cultural upbringing caused her to struggle with internalized homophobia for many years, and took a great toll on her and her relationships. I could wish for a followup or epilogue to this story, because - as she had predicted - her life chang This is more of a hiding-out story than a coming-out story. I could wish for a followup or epilogue to this story, because - as she had predicted - her life changed drastically after coming out as lesbian.

It appears that although she lost a good deal of her previous financial and popular success, she has finally found a loving and supportive partner and was able to marry and start a family. That might be worth a lot more than gold records to her now.

Jun 23, Devon rated it really liked it Shelves: I enjoyed the book and one of my favorite lines from it is this: I am not a negative to be tolerated, and I don't think that other minority groups would feel comforted and equal to hear leaders of the general public self-righteously proclaim that "we" should "tolerate them. As Rupaul likes to say At times it was slightly sporadic, but I enjoyed her story and learning about her.

This was a pretty easy read and country singer Chely Wright's got a good story. I think she did a great job nailing what being in the closet makes a person do and the toll those choices take over time. It's not always chronological, which can sometimes throw you. It feels more like you're going through a box of photographs of her life, all thrown in together in no particular order, and she's telling you about each one as she pulls them out of the box.

And that's not bad, just a little different. As someone who came out later early 40s , I found a lot of it resonated with me even if the particulars I'm not a country music singer were different. Jun 19, Dana rated it really liked it Shelves: A lovely memoir from the first out lesbian country singer. Well-written and with a happy ending. Amazingly beautiful!! Jun 09, Joni rated it really liked it.

I respect and honor her honesty and courage to take a stand for herself. Jun 21, Vickie rated it really liked it. Chely Wright's Like Me starts very promisingly, with a bang.

Or, rather, the absence of a bang, as she confronts her darkest hour, gun in her mouth, and decides to put it down. From there, an outpouring begins, a flood of self-recriminations, guilty conciouses, hollow joys and a hand extended in solidarity to every person who has ever experienced a life like hers. A memoir is a touchy thing for me. Normally I think they're boring and lame.

Graf's Chinese husband and Bechdel's closeted father, respectively. I like to journal, and I often fall victim to the "Today I ate eggs for breakfast" subject that's about as interesting as a blade of grass amongst a yard of them. I respect a good navel-gazing, then, for the sheer effort it takes to not talk about yourself and the boring things. Phoebe Damrosch wrote a blog that eventally became a book, and while talking about food was the high point, she spoke too much about a subject that was boring: Actually, considering she was having an illicit affair with a coworker behind another cowoker's back, you would think there would be some fur flying!

Unfortunately, to the detriment of the book, no such drama occurs. Wright, on the other hand, is quick to point the finger at herself. She has been doing so since she was a little girl, literally praying every night for God to take the gay away. After going through her childhood, which was actually a fairly entertaining and heartwarming romp througb the Heartland, we land in post-puberty-ville and the line of broekn relationships begin. After a while, the book starts to sound like a "My Name is Earl" styled list of wronged men and women.

Wright began this book as a catharsis, as an outlet for the guilt and pressure that lead to that one horrible night when she almost ended her life. She could as easily be reading this book to a pastor in a confessional as to a friend, parent, or God himself.

Frankly, I liked this matter-of-fact tone, as if she were really talking to you. Her personable, respectful manner permeates every sentence, making every page seem to have come directly from her mouth to your ears. All in all, it makes her seem pretty down to Earth and normal.

And this ability, this tone, is what makes this book work. She isn't crazy with mood swings, dripping syrupy lines and unnecessary embellishes all over the place. She's normal.

She isn't sprinkling lots of gay language and culture references, because she's "normal". She doesn't go tapping her foot in random public restrooms for sex; she meets people normally, falls in love with people she gets to know normally, and has horrible break-ups like any normal person would. And that's what I love the most about this book. This book is for those kids out there like her, who wish the gay away, because you are just like everybody else in every other way. You can have the talent, and escape your small hometown, and find success and travel the world, but the gay goes with you.

But remind yourself, there are people just "Like Me". There was one area, though, where I felt that Wright broke the fourth wall a bit more than necessary, and it was in reference to her intimate relations with fellow country star Brad Paisley.

Her comments seemed to have a certain pointedness to them--not directed at him, but at the industry and culture--that kind of drew you away from her journey. Perhaps I only felt this way because he is one of the few named, and known, people in the book. Overall, it's a good read. Coupled with the short chapters, it felt a lot like a bedtime snack to relax to before drifting off. You feel as if you know Chely, and you can empathize with her.

And if there's the added bonus of making one parent show their child understanding, it has worked. I do love having a real book, though, you know? Glossy photo pages, the smell of it, know what I mean? Nov 16, Emily rated it liked it Shelves: Chely Wright's Like Me suffers from some of the same problems as many memoirs - in fact, you could say these attributes are essential to the genre of confessional memoirs. There's quite a bit of name-dropping. There's also lots of jumping around chronologically, which can be confusing, though you could argue that the short chapters are actually intended to be thematically grouped vignettes, I suppose.

There are the obligatory swipes at those who she felt deserved to be taken down a notch - like Chely Wright's Like Me suffers from some of the same problems as many memoirs - in fact, you could say these attributes are essential to the genre of confessional memoirs.

There are the obligatory swipes at those who she felt deserved to be taken down a notch - like John Rich, Dick Cheney, and unnamed "radio guys" radio programmers, program directors, and consultants who control whose music actually gets heard. And then there's a straddling of the line between telling your own story and telling someone else's.

For the most part, I thought Ms. Wright did fairly well sticking to her own story, her experiences, her perceptions, but there were a few times I thought she went a bit too far telling someone else's story and I felt uncomfortable for them. I wonder, for example, how Julia, the woman Ms. Wright describes as the "love of her life", feels about some of the incredibly intimate parts of their relationship being published for the whole world to read, especially considering that Ms.

Wright's fame was a constant source of conflict in their relationship.

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And I cringed a time or two on Brad Paisley's behalf, as well. However, I recognize that it would be incredibly hard sometimes to find the balance between fully telling your own story without, to some extent, telling others' stories as well. Wright conveys the sense of fear and falsity that pervaded her life in the closet, her desperation to hide her real self because of the personal and professional costs if her sexuality were to become common knowledge.

She points to how it poisoned her relationships, not only with significant others, but with her family and friends as well. She describes several of these unhealthy relationships, acknowledging how self-destructive some of her actions were. I wondered, though, how much of that stemmed from the abuse she described from her childhood and the dysfunctional relationship her parents had, in addition to the stress of being closeted in a very conservative environment. I was touched by her coming-out conversation with her father.

It was emotional, awkward, loving, fearful, and the beginning of some serious healing for her and for their relationship. Her realization that "I wanted one million people to love, accept, and approve of me I was afraid to let anyone down. Like Me is bookended by two powerful thoughts. The first is from Martin Luther King, Jr.: Wright herself: I'm not satisfied with that word. I am gay, and I am not seeking to be 'tolerated. I am not a negative to be tolerated, and I don't think that other minority groups would feel comforted and equal to hear leaders of the general public self-righteously proclaim that 'we' should 'tolerate them.

I hate it. I'm pretty sure it was meant as a statement of "Yes, even someone 'like me' can be gay, so get over it already! For more book reviews, come visit my blog, Build Enough Bookshelves. May 04, Kristin rated it really liked it. When I learned of the story behind this book, I was deeply saddened. Not that Chely is gay, that part doesn't influence whether I like or dislike her music, but that she felt so ashamed of her secret that it almost cost her her life. As I listened to her songs in the days following her coming out, all I could think about was how she nearly chose to silence that beautiful voice and what a loss that would be to the world.

I was interested in reading Chely's book because I've always enjoyed her mus When I learned of the story behind this book, I was deeply saddened. I was interested in reading Chely's book because I've always enjoyed her music and have read a number of other country music autobiographies, but it took a while before I found a copy in the stores.

If you are strongly opposed to a homosexual country singer, I recommend not reading this book, because Chely devotes equal time to her rise to success and how keeping her secret affected her life at these critical junctures.

She knew she was a lesbian early on, developing a crush on a pretty grade school teacher, but social cues and a limited exposure to knowledge about homosexuality convinced her not to act on those impulses. By the time she had her first intimate relationship with another woman, she also knew she wanted to be a country singer and that there had never been an 'out' singer who became a star, so to reveal the truth at that point would have killed her career before it began.

Through 1 hits and strong record sales, she found it easier to come across as an extremely private person who keeps her personal and professional lives separate than risk letting any hints that she was living with another woman slip.

I imagine I was like many country music fans in reacting with a bit of surprise when Chely came out because I remembered that she dated Brad Paisley before he was married, but it was simply one of many attempts by Chely to see if God had answered her prayers and granted her an attraction to men.

I read Brad's autobiography, which was written before Chely's book, but I don't recall whether he included anything about their relationship or not. As a Facebook follower of hers before this book was released and now since, I've been able to follow how things have changed both for the good and bad. Some of her concerns came true, that she would likely lose most of her radio airplay, invites to play the Grand Ole Opry She and Paisley were the only non-members to perform on the Opry's 75th birthday TV special.

He has since become a member. She has not. However, good has come of it, the most obvious being that she no longer feels the internal hatred of who she is and fears of being found out, is married, and has twin sons with her wife.

Other country singers have cited her courage when they revealed their own homosexuality, and she has become a strong supporter of gay rights in the Bible belt. I did feel that Chely's music career took a back seat in this book, but it did make sense as to why when the potential audience reaches far beyond country music fans who know all her hits. She just glazes over the high points of her career and the lesser known albums and singles don't get a mention, but I imagine that writing the book and focusing on all the parts of her life that she had to keep hidden for so long was very cathartic, whereas her career highs and lows had already been written about extensively in magazines and internet articles because she kept the personal side to herself in those days.

If writing a book and spilling her soul out into the pages is what Chely Wright needed to keep herself from ending her life and in fact allows her to finally life that life to the fullest for the first time, then I'll take a glossed over account of her fame in exchange for the potential to hear new music.

I believed that I had it in my power to maintain the approval of all one million people, and anything short of pleasing every single one of them was unacceptable to me.

I also have her CD "Lifted Off the Ground," and these three media offerings serve as something of a "trifecta" of Chely's coming out journey, each one complimenting and enriching the other. This is also the only celebrity autobiography I've ever read that doesn't have a ghostwriter credited -- probably because she was writing it in secret for months, without a publisher lined up, as the first step in coming out publicly.

As such, the book is more a collection of short stories about her experiences as a lesbian and in country music, and the somewhat stilted writing, especially near the beginning, reveals her lingering discomfort or "old-fashioned" sensibilities when it comes to homosexuality example: As the book goes on, she more naturally starts using conversational language around her experience of being gay.

This "collection of thoughts and stories" approach keeps the book from having a clear narrative arc, and there often are not tidy segues from one chapter to the next. The short chapters can feel somewhat abrupt, but they feel fitting in a book about fragmenting yourself.

This is not a titillating "tell-all. Still, Chely is a surprisingly competent writer. I say surprising because writing is not her profession, and it takes most writers years to attain anything even close to mastery. While the prose isn't transcendent or particularly beautiful, it's authentic and filled with specific details that easily ground the reader in Chely's experience. Overall, it feels so real and relate-able even though the life of a country singer on a major label is so different from mine.

Through it all, Chely seems to remain grounded and down-to-earth, aware of her privileged position and also not out of touch with the way the rest of the world lives. This captures her sensibilities particularly well: Mind you, the work that was being asked of me was not that difficult—they weren't asking me to throw hay bales up on the back of a flatbed trailer; they weren't asking me to pour and finish concrete.

It was not hard labor, for the most part. They were asking me to come in and sign five hundred posters at once—big deal. As such, her voice is an important one for progressives and conservatives alike, and she bridges the gap with strength and authenticity.When I learned of the story behind this book, I was deeply saddened.

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It proves that you're not only good enough, you're worth everything. My record sales went directly in half. A new EP, titled Revival will be released on May 10, Coming out at what in her late 30's must have been HUGE. Also, if you're triggered by parental abuse, here's a warning for that. Want to Read Currently Reading Read.

Sorry if that sounds mean or insensitive Ms.