GONE WITH THE WIND EBOOK

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Gone with the Wind. Margaret Mitchell. This web edition published by [email protected] Adelaide. Last updated Wednesday, December 17, at To the best of . free ebook of Gone with the Wind. Check out the story behind the book, Gone with the Wind, at Wikipedia. From there you can read about the film of the same. Read online or download for free graded reader ebook and audiobook Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell of intermediate-plus level you can download in.


Gone With The Wind Ebook

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Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell; 92 editions; First published in ; Go to the editions section to read or download ebooks. Editorial Reviews. kaz-news.info Review. Sometimes only remembered for the epic motion Kindle Store · Kindle eBooks · Literature & Fiction. Editorial Reviews. kaz-news.info Review. Sometimes only remembered for the epic motion Look inside this book. Gone With The Wind by [Mitchell, Margaret] .

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Why do you think she feels this way? Does her opinion change throughout the novel? Discuss the times when this is true. Why does he have this attitude? Is Rhett ever purely generous? Is this a fair favor to ask?

Why do Scarlett and Rhett feel the need to trick one another? Are there ever moments when they allow themselves to be vulnerable with each other? Why is honesty such a problem for them? When the Yankees arrive in Atlanta, Rhett leaves Scarlett in the wagon to take care of Melanie and the others. Why does he leave them behind, as well as a life of comfort, to join the army he claims to dislike so much?

On her deathbed, Ellen calls out for her lost love, Philippe. Why does Margaret Mitchell include this seemingly insignificant back-story? Does this relationship parallel any others in the novel? Does this moment change Scarlett? From where does she find her strength?

Scarlett is often annoyed that her son, Wade Hampton, appears to prefer Aunt Melly. How would you describe her relationship with Wade? Much like his father Charles, why is he mentioned so infrequently?

Do you judge Scarlett when she yells at him? How would you describe Melanie—as weak or strong? If so, why does she remain so loyal to her? Describe Atlanta once the war is over. Besides the physical damages, what are the biggest changes?

Why do you think some of the newly free men remain loyal to their white families, while others try to start new lives? When Ashley returns to Tara, he confides in Scarlett that despite his wartime heroics, he considers himself a coward. What does he mean by this statement? Do you agree with him? Does Scarlett agree? Were they ever really in love, or do they just admire each other greatly? If so, why do you think this is? What makes Scarlett different?

Does she still care what they think of her? Ashley sees his sister, India Wilkes, standing in the doorway. Before the party has even begun, a rumor of an affair between Ashley and Scarlett spreads, and Rhett and Melanie hear it. Melanie refuses to accept any criticism of her sister-in-law, and India Wilkes is banished from the Wilkeses' home for it, causing a rift in the family.

Rhett, more drunk than Scarlett has ever seen him, returns home from the party long after Scarlett. His eyes are bloodshot, and his mood is dark and violent. He enjoins Scarlett to drink with him. Not wanting him to know she is fearful of him, she throws back a drink and gets up from her chair to go back to her bedroom. He stops her and pins her shoulders to the wall.

She tells him he is jealous of Ashley, and Rhett accuses her of "crying for the moon" [29] over Ashley. He tells her they could have been happy together saying, "for I loved you and I know you. Scarlett finds herself missing him, but she is still unsure if Rhett loves her, having said it while drunk.

She learns she is pregnant with her fourth child. When Rhett returns, Scarlett waits for him at the top of the stairs. She wonders if Rhett will kiss her, but to her irritation, he does not.

He says she looks pale. She says it's because she is pregnant. He sarcastically asks if the father is Ashley. She calls Rhett a cad and tells him no woman would want his baby. He says, "Cheer up, maybe you'll have a miscarriage. She is seriously ill for the first time in her life, having lost her child and broken her ribs. Rhett is remorseful, believing he has killed her. Sobbing and drunk, he buries his head in Melanie's lap and confesses he has been a jealous cad.

Scarlett, who is thin and pale, goes to Tara, taking Wade and Ella with her, to regain her strength and vitality from "the green cotton fields of home. She finds Rhett's attitude has noticeably changed. He is sober, kinder, polite—and seemingly disinterested. Though she misses the old Rhett at times, Scarlett is content to leave well enough alone. Bonnie is four years old in Spirited and willful, she has her father wrapped around her finger and giving in to her every demand.

Even Scarlett is jealous of the attention Bonnie gets. Rhett rides his horse around town with Bonnie in front of him, but Mammy insists it is not fitting for a girl to ride a horse with her dress flying up. Rhett heeds her words and downloads Bonnie a Shetland pony , whom she names "Mr. Butler," and teaches her to ride sidesaddle. Then Rhett pays a boy named Wash twenty-five cents to teach Mr.

Butler to jump over wood bars.

When Mr. Butler is able to get his fat legs over a one-foot bar, Rhett puts Bonnie on the pony, and soon Mr. Butler is leaping bars and Aunt Melly's rose bushes. Wearing her blue velvet riding habit with a red feather in her black hat, Bonnie pleads with her father to raise the bar to one and a half feet.

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He gives in, warning her not to come crying if she falls. Bonnie yells to her mother, "Watch me take this one! Bonnie breaks her neck in the fall, and dies.

In the dark days and months following Bonnie's death, Rhett is often drunk and disheveled, while Scarlett, though deeply bereaved also, seems to hold up under the strain. With the untimely death of Melanie Wilkes who was pregnant again, a short time later, Rhett decides he only wants the calm dignity of the genial South he once knew in his youth and leaves Atlanta to find it. Meanwhile, Scarlett dreams of love that has eluded her for so long. However, she still has Tara and knows she can win Rhett back, because "tomorrow is another day.

During the time span of the novel, from to , Scarlett ages from sixteen to twenty-eight years. This is a type of Bildungsroman , [34] a novel concerned with the moral and psychological growth of the protagonist from youth to adulthood coming-of-age story. Scarlett's development is affected by the events of her time.

The novel is known for its exceptional "readability". Genre[ edit ] Gone with the Wind is often placed in the literary subgenre of the historical romance novel. Of the servants who stayed at Tara, Scarlett thinks, "There were qualities of loyalty and tirelessness and love in them that no strain could break, no money could download.

Mitchell wrote that other field slaves were "loyal" and "refused to avail themselves of the new freedom", [42] but the novel has no field slaves who stay on the plantation to work after they have been emancipated. American William Wells Brown escaped from slavery and published his memoir, or slave narrative , in He wrote of the disparity in conditions between the house servant and the field hand: During the time that Mr.

Cook was overseer, I was a house servant—a situation preferable to a field hand, as I was better fed, better clothed, and not obliged to rise at the ringing bell, but about an half hour after. I have often laid and heard the crack of the whip, and the screams of the slave.

While shot and shell thundered to release the shackles of slavery from her body and her soul—she loved, fought for, and protected—Us who held her in bondage, her "Marster" and her "Missus! Elliott, You kain sen' me nowhar Ah doan wanter go," but Mammy remains duty-bound to "Miss Ellen's chile.

Eighteen years before the publication of Gone with the Wind, an article titled, "The Old Black Mammy," written in the Confederate Veteran in , discussed the romanticized view of the mammy character that had persisted in Southern literature The southern belle was believed to be physically attractive but, more importantly, personally charming with sophisticated social skills. She is subject to the correct code of female behavior. For young Scarlett, the ideal southern belle is represented by her mother, Ellen O'Hara.

For Scarlett, the ideal is embodied in her adored mother, the saintly Ellen, whose back is never seen to rest against the back of any chair on which she sits, whose broken spirit everywhere is mistaken for righteous calm All social and educational pursuits were directed towards it.

Despite the Civil War and loss of a generation of eligible men, young ladies were still expected to marry. The exhibit asked, "Was Scarlett a Lady? White women performed traditional jobs such as teaching and sewing, and generally disliked work outside the home. Many were middle- and upper class women who had never worked for wages or seen the inside of a hospital.

One such nurse was Ada W. Bacot, a young widow who had lost two children. Bacot came from a wealthy South Carolina plantation family that owned 87 slaves. The foul air from this mass of human beings at first made me giddy and sick, but I soon got over it.

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We have to walk, and when we give the men any thing kneel, in blood and water; but we think nothing of it at all. Several battles are mentioned or depicted in Gone with the Wind. They did not expect defeat. The first fighting in Georgia and the most significant Union defeat. The city became the supply and logistics base for Sherman's Atlanta Campaign. Union General Sherman suffers heavy losses to the entrenched Confederate army.

Are there any women he does respect? Why them as opposed to others? Discuss the many complicated issues of race in this novel. Mammy and Pork consider themselves a higher status than those who work in the field.

Why do they believe this? Both during wartime and afterwards, what other similarities exist between Scarlett and her adopted home? Is she being selfish or merely honest? Why do you think she feels this way?

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Does her opinion change throughout the novel? Discuss the times when this is true. Why does he have this attitude? Is Rhett ever purely generous?

Is this a fair favor to ask?

Why do Scarlett and Rhett feel the need to trick one another? Are there ever moments when they allow themselves to be vulnerable with each other? Why is honesty such a problem for them? When the Yankees arrive in Atlanta, Rhett leaves Scarlett in the wagon to take care of Melanie and the others. Why does he leave them behind, as well as a life of comfort, to join the army he claims to dislike so much?

On her deathbed, Ellen calls out for her lost love, Philippe. Why does Margaret Mitchell include this seemingly insignificant back-story?

Does this relationship parallel any others in the novel? Does this moment change Scarlett? From where does she find her strength? Scarlett is often annoyed that her son, Wade Hampton, appears to prefer Aunt Melly.

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How would you describe her relationship with Wade? Much like his father Charles, why is he mentioned so infrequently? Do you judge Scarlett when she yells at him? How would you describe Melanie—as weak or strong? If so, why does she remain so loyal to her? Describe Atlanta once the war is over.

Besides the physical damages, what are the biggest changes? Why do you think some of the newly free men remain loyal to their white families, while others try to start new lives?

When Ashley returns to Tara, he confides in Scarlett that despite his wartime heroics, he considers himself a coward.An Outlander Novella. The Taming of the Queen. Why is honesty such a problem for them?

Is it a matter of race, or politics, or dislike of the Yankees? Many novels have been written about the Civil War and its aftermath. Worth, Texas.

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Wade is seven years old in when his half-sister, Eugenie Victoria , named after two queens, is born. Discuss the times when this is true. She finds Rhett's attitude has noticeably changed. Stories by English Authors: