KARI AMRUTA PATIL PDF

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They were inseparable – until the day they jumped. Ruth, saved by safety nets, leaves the city. Kari, saved by a sewer, crawls back into the fray of the living. – Neel Mukherjee in his review of Kari (Biblio:) Sensuously illustrated and livened by wry commentaries on life and love, Kari gives a new voice to graphic fiction in India. Boundaries and their Transgression: A Queer reading of Amruta Patil’s graphic novel ‘Kari’. Amruta Patil and Kari - Download as Word Doc .doc), PDF File .pdf), Text File . txt) or read online.


Kari Amruta Patil Pdf

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Read online or Download Kari by Amruta Patil (Full PDF ebook with essay, research paper) For Your PC or Mobile. Overview. They were inseparable – until the. Read online or Download Kari by Amruta Patil (Full PDF ebook with essay, research paper) For Your. Kari [Amruta Patil] on kaz-news.info *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. They were inseparable - until the day they jumped. Ruth, saved by safety nets, leaves.

I wanted to send out an unusual protagonist into the Indian literary scene. A young, deeply introverted, asocial and queer woman - counterpoint to the hyperfeminine prototypes one keeps coming across.

And yet, the book is not a coming-out tale. People love quick synopses. I was keen to try a crossover literary form - it is more texty than most comics or graphic novels - and the story flows from voice-over style narrative text to visuals, and then back to voice-over.

As I say in every interview - there are various experiments going on in Kari - some are not particularly successful, others have worked out ok. The book is very raw - I was working on instinct. Future work will have resolved these experiments in a better fashion.

Do readers expect it to be autobiographical? Oh the famous autobiography question. Unlike in India, where the book was taken for its content, in the West I am continually met with the question about autobiography. I guess people are curious about the personal lives of women of a certain age, particularly if their work also features women of a certain age. The media will eat you up like a careless snack and spit you out.

Whether something is autobiographical or not ought to be completely irrelevant to the reader. And to the reading experience.

Amruta Patil and Kari

And certainly to the merits and demerits of the book. How tedious to write only about oneself. How aware were you of graphic novels in other countries, like Maus or Persepolis?

I became aware of them in my twenties. That I ought to be more meticulous about my artwork.

That I need to exercise utmost discrimination in spitting things out into the print world. Bookshops are filled with swill - one needs tell stories that matter.

Tell me about your current project Parva, your approach, your ambitions for it, how it is changing your techniques. Parva is a mammoth of a project that I am trying to steer by its tail.

It is based on the Mahabharat - the great old Indian mythohistorical epic about pretty much every human preoccupation under the sun. Many Indian writers come back to the feet of these epics at some point in their career - it is almost a coming-of-age ritual. The project has changed me, keeps on changing me. I was always meant to do it. But in getting around to making a start - I have gone from cocky and ambitious to far more diffident and humble.

I am living differently than I used to - more pared down, austere. The way I eat has changed, as has the way I conduct myself in the world. Which is the only way one ought to be working on a project like this. Technically - it is more visually-led than Kari. There are frequent style shifts, to allow for the story-nested-within story approach. For now, I am taking it one step at a time, one tiny episode at a time. I have staggered the project into parts. You are also co-editor on the magazine Mindfields - please tell me more about this project.

Mindfields is a quarterly print journal about ideas and education. It hopes to contribute - in whatever tiny way it can - to bring some spark and self-esteem into the school system and school staffrooms in India.

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The drawings often reflect Karis tortured state of mind and restless imagination, and theres some ambiguity in her version of events. In fact, its possible to wonder as indeed another character in the book does at one point if Ruth ever really existed.

Many graphic novels are writer-artist collaborations, but you wear both hats. As a child, were you more inclined towards drawing or writing? There has always been a definite keel towards the written word. I like to draw, but my applied art training makes me see illustration from a versatile, do-what'sneeded slant.

My writing is more careful, more uncompromised. When I was a child, my mother illustrated every story that she told me. It was a lot of fun. I remember sitting atop a full newsprint sheet on the terrace as we drew, so that the paper would not fly away!

They were growing stories I'd add to where she left off, in word as on paper. We took great pains to draw out the houses and hills and cats and people that formed our stories! At the launch, you mentioned working as a museum security guard in Boston, and how it helped you observe people and pick subjects for your drawings.

Can you elaborate on this experience? It was the penury of being an art student in the US that led to the museum security guard experience. Besides, being around mummies and medieval Madonnas seemed like a more interesting job than waitressing or working in a photocopy place. The feeling was not just that of being invisible, but of being almost subhuman.

AMRUTA PATIL on graphic books

It's amazing how hundred upon hundreds of human beings can pass you by without making eye contact. When they did make eye contact, it was to get directions to the restroom.

It made for a great vantage point for eavesdropping and watching. How did you first become interested in the graphic novel form? What are your favourite works in the medium? Write, and draw that's what I know how to do. Working in a medium that combined both the disciplines seemed like an obvious way to go.

Whats the story behind Kari?Besides, being around mummies and medieval Madonnas seemed like a more interesting job than waitressing or working in a photocopy place. I have staggered the project into parts. It's amusing to witness the depiction of Kari's thought process which is so complex, yet so simple.

I was keen to try a crossover literary form - it is more texty than most comics or graphic novels - and the story flows from voice-over style narrative text to visuals, and then back to voice-over. Your drawings show a range of styles.