MARILYN MANSON LONG HARD ROAD OUT OF HELL PDF

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The best-selling autobiography of America's most controversial celebrity icon, Marilyn Manson (with a bonus chapter not in the hardcover).In his twenty-nine. The best-selling autobiography of America's most controversial celebrity icon, Marilyn Manson (with a bonus chapter not in the hardcover).In his twenty-nin. Editorial Reviews. kaz-news.info Review. One doesn't usually think of rock stars as insightful, but, against all odds, glam-trash superstar Marilyn Manson has.


Marilyn Manson Long Hard Road Out Of Hell Pdf

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Read "The Long Hard Road Out of Hell" by Marilyn Manson available from Rakuten Kobo. Sign up today and get $5 off your first download. The best-selling . Get this from a library! The long hard road out of hell. [Marilyn Manson; Neil Strauss] -- When this best-selling autobiography was originally released, readers . This is written by Marilyn Manson & Neil Strauss, Manson's autobiography if you will. % credit to them. I'm just putting this out there for some people who.

I found, for a man with no previous experience as an author, his writing was exceptional. Of course there was papragraphs, or phrases that make you cringe, but it's Marilyn Manson, and if you can't start reading the book with that in mind, I don't recommend you even try. Hail Marilyn: Jul 09, Mari rated it it was ok. I will start by saying that I'm not big on autobiographies at all.

In my mind those are for uninteresting people who's made no impact on the world what so ever and who wants to read about them. Still, for many years I've been a fan of Marilyn Manson's music and as an ignorant 15 year old I considered Brian Warner a person I had things in common with and respected very much.

The Long Hard Road Out of Hell

This book shows exactly why some people should never write books about themselves. The idea of reading Marilyn Manson's biog I will start by saying that I'm not big on autobiographies at all.

The idea of reading Marilyn Manson's biography did of course capture my interest but it really didn't live up to my expectations. The first half of the book is basically dedicaded to his childhood of course and family which I found very dull and predictable.

Of course the whole MM concept is based on rebellion against a childhood trauma his parents put him in a Christian school, cry me a river like everyone else's. Admittedly this was at times interesting to read. I'm a fan of absurd and original people and of course I wanted to know more about how this man is thinking, his views and philosophies.

About irrelevant things that has happened to him in the past - not so much. I feel like an autobiography should actually contribute with something more than boring teenage years' stories and this book didn't.

Like how he lost his virginity - I don't give a crap! If you're gonna tell every detail no one cares about maybe you should just wait until your death bed so you can make sure you get everything. The rest of the book is not so much about his music as it is about grotesque anecdotes and drugs. He tries so hard to showcase his hardcore, supercool rock n roll lifestyle it looks dumb. Maybe I'm just sensitive but some of the things were merely disgusting.

On the plus side some parts made me laugh and I liked the illustrations. I still think he's an interesting character even though I have trouble respecting people with drug habits.

In the future I will just watch interviews because this book does not do him justice.

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Apr 15, Sean de la Rosa rated it liked it. I'm not a fan of his music at all but WOW, what a roller coaster of a read this autobiography was. Don't be fooled, Manson is uber-intelligent. The levels of depravity he reaches is simply shocking. What did surprise me though in the last few chapters dealing with personal confessions is that this satanist is frightened by nightmares and still fears the dark?

Although she remains a symbol of beauty and glamour, she had a dark side just as Charles Manson had a good, intelligent side. The balance between good and evil, and the choices we make between them, are probably the single most important aspects shaping our personalities and humanity. Read this one when the kiddies are in bed. Nov 14, Roxy Smith rated it it was amazing.

Understanding his childhood I think will help people understand him and I think that is his intention. He talks about everything from rape and molestation to drugs and corrupt adults in his life.

The struggle that got him to where he is today and the path he took to get there. It is hard to imagine Manson as a regular person after reading his autobiography and all of the things that he has been though, but these are the things that makes him a person.

Manson writes in such a demented and distasteful manner that is absolutely appalling, yet you find it hard to put his book down. Jul 26, Vanessa rated it it was amazing. I don't remember what exactly encouraged me to read this book.

But when I finally obtain this book in my hands, I was excited and thrilled to learn about Marilyn Manson Brian Warner life and how he came to be.

I'm not a huge fan of ebooks, but since the Los Angeles Public Library has free ebooks to check out and read for 21 days, it's definitely worth it. I realized when I read the first chapter, that I was entering a very deep dark explicit world that I was not necessarily comfortable with. A I don't remember what exactly encouraged me to read this book. At the same time, I had a feeling that this was no ordinary autobiography, not just an ordinary book to read for fun.

It starts off with his childhood and how he was exposed to adult content at a very young age and his experience with Christianity. Throughout the book he didn't miss a single detail of his drug adventures, his experiences of betrayal, his vulnerabilities, his sexual experiences that he had with his band members. It was as though the reader was dragged into a deep dark tunnel, almost literally there observing his path as a artist; that's how amazing the imagery in this book. I almost felt like I was wasting my time reading this, but then I realized that perhaps that's the intention of the book, to have a sense of what he felt at certain moments in his life, like the chapter when he describes the making of the Antichrist album.

But like any tunnel there is an end to that darkness. He soon realized that drugs where not allowing him to be productive. That was my favorite part, not because it's uplifting but because it shows someone realizing on their own their mistakes and know that they can be fixed in order to achieve their ambitions.

Overall, no matter how disturbing and haunting this book was for me, it was a very special read. I enjoyed it, it was brutally honest, and well it was just bloody amazing. I totally recommend this autobiography, because it's human. View 1 comment. Words cannot express how awful this book was. Antichrist Superstar? More like pretentious, hypocritical, immature douchebag.

Ah, the s. Those kids were obviously dumber than dog shit. My imaginary conversation with the author while reading this book: Tell me, what wa Words cannot express how awful this book was. Tell me, what was so hellish?

You didn't like school? Sometimes girls you liked didn't like you back, and sometimes girls you dated broke up with you? MY GOD! The horror! No man in history has suffered as you have! Soooo scary! Got it. Oh, wait - there's more? Oh, I see: You like to take drugs and do stupid, gross things. That's neat. What else ya got? Taking drugs and doing stupid, gross things?

Oh, man; that is just sooo cool and sooo dark. OK, I'll bite: What did you talk about? Whether or not you'd have a relationship with Traci Lords? Dang, I can't even attempt sarcasm: That's fucking hilarious. May 25, Rebecca McNutt rated it liked it. This book wasn't bad; it debunks several allegations that Manson or Brian Warner is the devil, the cause of the Columbine shooting or a teen suicide influence, and proves that without the stage makeup, this guy is pretty normal though rather a jerk and a bully at times and very full of himself, convinced he has all the answers.

What I didn't like was that much of it was ranting about his childhood, trying to evoke a pity party with disturbing memories, much like the notorious Running with Sci This book wasn't bad; it debunks several allegations that Manson or Brian Warner is the devil, the cause of the Columbine shooting or a teen suicide influence, and proves that without the stage makeup, this guy is pretty normal though rather a jerk and a bully at times and very full of himself, convinced he has all the answers.

What I didn't like was that much of it was ranting about his childhood, trying to evoke a pity party with disturbing memories, much like the notorious Running with Scissors I've really lost any possible respect for Marilyn Manson; I don't think he's evil or a devil but I think that the way he cruelly torments people as if he's a schoolyard bully is just nasty and immature behavior. Gangbanging a deaf girl? A nazi memorabilia collection? Seriously, how much of this behavior is all done in a pathetic effort to retain his Addams Family "I'm so unique" stage image?

This book certainly has its moments, and when it does, they're always incredibly well-written and include everything from humor to deep seriousness. But after about a hundred-some pages of ranting and raving about a pervert grandfather and a religious school, it gets a little old. Jan 24, Olga rated it really liked it. Manson is the man and I've been listening to him for the good half of my life.

Don't know if it makes me sound young or old. After reading this book, many "burning" questions were satisfied with needed knowledge. So, all the rumors about Manson's relationship with his band mates or changing his skeletal anatomy to perform specific acts are well, just rumors.

Along with numerous public "affidavits" of his "immoral" behavior. Of course, there were moments that made me cringe and not everything he Manson is the man and I've been listening to him for the good half of my life. Of course, there were moments that made me cringe and not everything he did I fully support, but in the end, he's a performer and most of his "disgusting" moves were done just to make the public feel all their flaws and imperfections.

Writing is decent yet very simple, looks like Srauss did some heavy editing to sell another product. While listening to Manson speaking, you can feel how much he means by his unspoken word, and the book erases that feeling, for most of the time. There are interviews, documents, pictures and Manson's dreams in some chapters, and those are my personal favorites. The book was published in , and logically, it covers only a period of his life till then. Manson changed a lot since then. His lyrics, social image and the stage behavior.

He's always been somewhat a media-diva, unlike other "true-metal" stars, but he never actually claimed to perform metal.. Still, he dreamed to be a big rock star and he's confident that goal has been achieved. May 24, Trisha rated it did not like it Shelves: The book does not lend itself to either of those things.

The material was initially eccentric enough to be interesting but as my senses dulled the book became increasingly boring. Manson is never able to overcome the powerful angst that he feels as a youth. Instead of trying to develop his character, he fuels his angst with drugs and acts of shock. He continually brings up his religious and philosophical studies but unfortunately elaborates much more on his dark nightmares, psychedelic trips, and backstage drug-addled experiences.

Throughout the book he identifies and attempts to humiliate individuals by relating subjective stories about their personalities and their situations. I was disappointed to find his account filled with contempt, revenge, and misanthropy rather than a discussion around radical individualism think Ayn Rand. Jun 04, Stephen rated it liked it Shelves: Chances are, regardless if you've heard his music or not, you've at least heard of Marilyn Manson.

Though he's lost some of his notoriety over the years, he was Public Enemy 1 for religious leaders and politicians in the mid to late 90's.

Now, whereas I don't consider myself a fan of his music, I've always been fascinated by Brian Warner, the man behind the alter-ego of Marilyn Manson. In interviews, Manson has always come across as intelligent and articulate, so I was curious to see the man be Chances are, regardless if you've heard his music or not, you've at least heard of Marilyn Manson.

In interviews, Manson has always come across as intelligent and articulate, so I was curious to see the man behind the makeup.

The biggest impression I walked away from was that Brian Warner doesn't want to be Marilyn Manson, but in a way he feels like he has to. In most of the book, he laments the sex, drugs and rock and roll lifestyle, but then goes on to go into detail about some of his backstage escapades.

The thing is, he does so without the usual "rock star gusto" you would expect from Gene Simmons or Tommy Lee. Rather, Warner seems almost resentful about his behavior, as if he doesn't want to do these things, but feels he must for some obscure dedication to being a rock star. That's not to say that the book isn't entertaining, but it doesn't reveal as much as I'd like.

I really wanted to learn more about him, but instead it feels like a fluff piece for a Rolling Stone article. And indeed, the book was co-written by a Rolling Stone author. If you're a fan of Manson, I recommended this book. It won't shed any new light about him, merely just reinforce all the things you like about him.

However, for those on the outside such as myself who wants to know the man behind Manson, I don't suggest reading this book.

Jan 17, Zuky the BookBum marked it as to-read. Aug 06, Anna rated it really liked it. This is a great insight into Mariyn's messed up brain. It's a funny, twisted read. I hadn't realised how sensitive he was underneath how seemingly heartless he seemed at times.

The depression and anger Manson feels in which he writes about can only come from his experiences in life - the hypocracy he was surrounded by from childhood I'm talking about Ms Price, his Grandfather, his school. It makes you think. It makes you realize the reason why a lot of people hate him or protest against him holding concerts claiming that he is 'Evil' is because they are not ready to see the world for what it is yet or are just judging him by his appearance.

It's one of the best autobiographies because he doesn't mess around, he actually has things worth saying.

The extracts from Manson's writings as a journalist - , his submissions to a fucked up horror magazine, some of his own stories and tortured poetry that were put in the book are perfect. He pisses all over the boundaries of what is acceptable and I love it though that shop one..

I skipped it mostly. I recommend this, if you like Manson's music or don't understand him at all. But, I don't recommend this if you get easily disgusted or if you have a weak stomach, ok. Our after-school forays into the cellar became half teenage boys wanting to find pornography to jerk off to and half a morbid fascination with our grandfather.

Nearly every day we made new and grotesque discoveries. There I found a stack of black and white bestiality pictures. I had seen Playboy and Penthouse before, but these photographs were in another class altogether. They were surreal—all the women were beaming real innocent flower-child smiles as they sucked and fucked these animals. There were also fetish magazines like Watersports and Black Beauty stashed behind the mirror.

Instead of stealing a whole magazine, we would take a razor blade and carefully cut out certain pages. Years later, we went back to find them, and they were still there—but frayed, deteriorated and covered with earthworms and slugs. Always hell-bent on stuffing her brood with food, my grandmother, Beatrice, was force-feeding us meat loaf and Jell-O, which was mostly water.

People always told me I resembled her because we were both skinny with the same narrow facial structure. Above the table hung a yellowing picture of the pope in a cheap brass frame. An imposing-looking family tree tracing the Warners back to Poland and Germany, where they were called the Wanamakers, was plastered on the wall nearby.

And crowning it all was a large, hollow, wooden crucifix with a gold Jesus on top, a dead palm leaf wrapped around it and a sliding top that concealed a candle and a vial of holy water. Under the kitchen table, there was a heating vent that led to the workbench in the cellar. Through it, we could hear my grandfather coughing and hacking down there. He had his CB radio on, but he never talked into it. He just listened.

He had been hospitalized with throat cancer when I was very young and, for as long as I could remember, I never heard his actual voice, just the jagged wheezing that he forced through his tracheostomy. We waited until we heard him leave the cellar, abandoned our meat loaf, poured our Jell-O into the heating vent and ventured downstairs. We could hear our grandmother calling futilely after us: Clean the rest of your plates!

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We were lucky all she did was yell that afternoon. Typically, if she caught us stealing food, talking back or goofing off, we were forced to kneel on a broomstick in the kitchen for anywhere from fifteen minutes to an hour, which resulted in perpetually bruised and scabbed knees.

Chad and I worked quickly and quietly. We knew what had to be done. Picking a rusted screwdriver off the floor, we pried the workbench drawer open wide enough so we could peek in. The first thing we saw was cellophane: Chad pushed the screwdriver deeper into the drawer. There was hair and lace. He wedged the screwdriver further, and I pulled until the drawer gave way. We began unwrapping the cellophane, but as soon as we saw what it concealed, we dropped the package to the floor.

Neither of us wanted to touch it. It was a collection of dildoes that had suction cups on the bottom. Maybe it was because I was so young, but they seemed enormous.

And they were covered with a hardened dark orange slime, like the gelatinous crust that builds up around a turkey when it is cooked. We later deduced that it was aged Vaseline. I made Chad wrap the dildoes up and put them back in the drawer. Just as we were trying to force the drawer shut, the cellar doorknob turned. Chad and I froze for a moment, then he grabbed my hand and dove under a plywood table that my grandfather had his toy trains set up on.

We were just in time to hear his footsteps near the bottom of the stairs. The floor was covered with train-set paraphernalia, mostly pine needles and fake snow, which made me think of powdered donuts trampled into dirt. The pine needles were prickling our elbows, the smell was nauseating and we were breathing heavily. We heard him shuffling around the room, hacking through the hole in his throat. There was a click, and his toy trains began clattering around the large track.

His black patent leather shoes appeared on the floor just in front of us. Slowly his feet began scraping against the ground, as if he were being violently rocked in his seat, and his hacking grew louder than the trains. The best analogy I can offer is an old, neglected lawn mower trying to sputter back to life.

But coming from a human being, it sounded monstrous. After an uncomfortable ten minutes passed, a voice called from the top of the stairs. Judas Priest on a pony! The train stopped, the feet stopped. Jack, what are you doing down there? My grandfather barked back, even more annoyed.

Then he slowly rose. We were Safe, for the time being. After doing our best to conceal the damage we had done to the workbench drawer, Chad and I walked to the top of the stairs and into the breezeway, where we kept our toys. Toys, in this case, being a pair of BB guns. Besides spying on my grandfather, the house had two other attractions: This time, we stuck close to the house and tried to knock birds out of trees. That afternoon I was out for blood and, unfortunately, a white rabbit crossed our path.

The thrill of hitting it was incommensurate, but then I went to examine the damage. It was still alive and blood was pouring out of its eye, soaking into its white fur. Its mouth kept meekly opening and closing, taking in air in a last, desperate attempt at life. For the first time, I felt bad for an animal I had shot.

Later, they dropped the Spooky Kids portion. Warner used the name Marilyn as it was the name of his mother's pet rat and it was a reference to Marilyn Monroe and Charles Manson.

The first few gigs did not bring much adulation or fans. Trevor Reznor of Nine Inch Nails, however, did notice them and eventually they became the opening act for that group which is when the group took off. Manson went on to become a controversial performer including simulated sex and acts of brutality in his appearances. Manson struggled all his life with self-worth and an inability to establish genuinely intimate relationships.

After Marilyn Manson became a successful band, Manson finally came to terms with his loss of humanity attributed in part to his dysfunctional family which led him to cocaine addiction and abusive behavior toward women.Robinson, Martin. Open Preview See a Problem?

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Report as inappropriate. My favourite part is when he describes an acid trip haha. This guy is NOT goth and his stupid religion is one of the major reasons Christianity still has power. Peter Criss. He wedged the screwdriver further, and I pulled until the drawer gave way. My grandfather barked back, even more annoyed.