NEW YORK TIMES NEWSPAPER PDF

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Download columns look at influencers and their interests. Today's Paper. The Times in Print For. The Front Page; International; National; Obituaries; Editorials, Op-Ed and Letters; New York; Business Day; Sports Friday . Another Way to Read Today's Paper. The daily newspaper, reimagined for the Web. Available to subscribers. Try It Now. Advertisement.


New York Times Newspaper Pdf

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Today's Paper. The Times in Print For. The Front Page; International; National; Obituaries; Editorials, Op-Ed and Letters; New York; Business Day; Sports. The New York Times Replica Edition is available to you at home or at work, and a variety of digital tools which enhance the printed newspaper's look and feel. Read the print edition on any device. The Replica Edition makes it easy to flip through today's paper and past issues. $ for 4 weeks. SUBSCRIBE.

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Content Expansion We encountered a fascinating issue in our attempt to expand the number of issues in TimesMachine. Initially, TimesMachine contained only those articles published between and The exclusion of data from after stems from an interesting historic quirk of our archive.

Starting around , The Times began keeping an archive of the complete digital text of every article published in print. In order to expand TimesMachine beyond and include links to the full text, we needed to know how our scanned print archive and our digital text archive aligned. Here is how we figured this out. The first step was to run optical character recognition OCR on articles in the scanned print archive to transcribe the text as cleanly as possible.

We used tesseract-ocr for this. We then had to figure out which articles matched up between these two buckets, which was an interesting process.

Because an OCRed article is seldom an exact match for its full text counterpart, we could not align articles by simply testing for string equality. Instead, we used fuzzy string matching.

We tokenize it by splitting it into a list of words separated by spaces. If we use a shingle size of 4, we end up with the following: 5 lists of tokens. As you can see, the contents of the lists overlap like shingles on a roof. When we generate the list of shingles for every article in the full text digital archive, we get something that looks like this: It is a reasonable hypothesis that sequences of words from an OCRed article will overlap a fair amount with sequences of words in that same article in the full text archive.

New York Times

We want a list of articles that contain each shingle so we can narrow down our options. Iterating through the above list, we can transform our data into the following hash table: Now that we have a mapping of all the shingles appearing in a given issue to all the full text articles from that issue containing each shingle, we repeat the first part of the process with the OCRed text, getting a list of shingles for each article.

This greatly reduces the problem space. Now, instead of having to compare every OCRed article in an issue to every full text article in an issue, which could involve tens of thousands of computationally expensive comparisons, we need only compare a short list.

This ends up reducing the number of comparisons by several orders of magnitude. To quantify the difference between the OCRed data and the full text articles, we used the Python difflib library.

Using this process, we could match approximately 80 percent of the articles. The remaining 20 percent did not have clear enough distinctions in scores, which required us to be a little more clever. In a perfect world, the relationship between our two buckets of articles would have been one-to-one, but in this world, it was actually many-to-many. Some full text articles were represented as multiple regions in the scanned archive, and some single regions in the scanned archive corresponded to multiple items in the full text archive.

We reconciled the disparity by splitting the data into paragraphs and carrying out a similar process to the one described above, on the paragraph level. The papers revealed, among other things, that the government had deliberately expanded its role in the war by conducting air strikes over Laos , raids along the coast of North Vietnam , and offensive actions taken by U.

Marines well before the public was told about the actions, all while President Lyndon B. Johnson had been promising not to expand the war. The document increased the credibility gap for the U.

His words to National Security Advisor Henry Kissinger included "People have gotta be put to the torch for this sort of thing The newspaper appealed and the case began working through the court system. On June 18, , The Washington Post began publishing its own series.

Ben Bagdikian , a Post editor, had obtained portions of the papers from Ellsberg.

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That day the Post received a call from the Assistant Attorney General, William Rehnquist , asking them to stop publishing. When the Post refused, the U. Justice Department sought another injunction. The U. District court judge refused, and the government appealed.

On June 26, , the U. United States , U.

On June 30, , the Supreme Court held in a 6—3 decision that the injunctions were unconstitutional prior restraints and that the government had not met the burden of proof required.

The justices wrote nine separate opinions, disagreeing on significant substantive issues. While it was generally seen as a victory for those who claim the First Amendment enshrines an absolute right to free speech , many felt it a lukewarm victory, offering little protection for future publishers when claims of national security were at stake.

Many criticized the move for betraying the paper's mission. The overall page width stayed the same, with each column becoming wider. Digital era A speech in the newsroom after announcement of Pulitzer Prize winners, The New York Times switched to a digital production process sometime before , but only began preserving the resulting digital text that year.

As online distribution of news increased in the s, the Times decided not renew the deal and in the newspaper regained electronic rights to its articles. The presses used by The New York Times allow four sections to be printed simultaneously; as the paper had included more than four sections all days except Saturday, the sections had to be printed separately in an early press run and collated together. The New York Times' announcement stated that the number of news pages and employee positions will remain unchanged, with the paper realizing cost savings by cutting overtime expenses.

Beginning October 16, , a two-page "Bay Area" insert was added to copies of the Northern California edition on Fridays and Sundays. The newspaper commenced production of a similar Friday and Sunday insert to the Chicago edition on November 20, The inserts consist of local news, policy, sports, and culture pieces, usually supported by local advertisements.

Following industry trends, its weekday circulation had fallen in to fewer than one million.

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The Federal Bureau of Investigation was reportedly investigating the attacks. The cyber security breaches have been described as possibly being related to cyberattacks that targeted other institutions, such as the Democratic National Committee. The lengthy article ran as an eight-page feature in the print edition and also was adapted into a shortened 2, word listicle featuring its key takeaways.

In , it moved to Nassau Street, and in to 41 Park Row , making it the first newspaper in New York City housed in a building built specifically for its use.

The newspaper's first general woman reporter was Jane Grant , who described her experience afterwards. She wrote, "In the beginning I was charged not to reveal the fact that a female had been hired".

Other reporters nicknamed her Fluff and she was subjected to considerable hazing. Because of her gender , promotions were out of the question, according to the then-managing editor.

The New York Times Media Kit

She was there for fifteen years, interrupted by World War I. Even those who witnessed her in action were unable to explain how she got the interviews she did. She never had to grovel for an appointment. When women were eventually allowed in to hear the speeches, they still were not allowed to ask the speakers questions, although men were allowed and did ask, even though some of the women had won Pulitzer Prizes for prior work.

She chose a difficult subject, an offensive subject. Her imagery was strong enough to revolt you.

Within 10 days, the FTC responded that it was not. Over 8, entries were submitted. It enables the team to accelerate the processing of documents that need to be reviewed. During March, , they documented that this tool enabled them to process documents in less than ten minutes in preparation for reporters to review the contents. Class A shareholders are permitted restrictive voting rights while Class B shareholders are allowed open voting rights.Show More in Sports Saturday.

In , it moved to Nassau Street, and in to 41 Park Row , making it the first newspaper in New York City housed in a building built specifically for its use.

Remember that you must be registered to Access all the magazines or newspapers on the web. Iterating through the above list, we can transform our data into the following hash table: Now that we have a mapping of all the shingles appearing in a given issue to all the full text articles from that issue containing each shingle, we repeat the first part of the process with the OCRed text, getting a list of shingles for each article.

By admin. Some full text articles were represented as multiple regions in the scanned archive, and some single regions in the scanned archive corresponded to multiple items in the full text archive. PDF Size: The New York Times Page 1 of The newspaper commenced production of a similar Friday and Sunday insert to the Chicago edition on November 20,