WAR OF THE WORLDS BOOK

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The War of the Worlds is a science fiction novel by English author H. G. Wells, first serialized in .. It was a long-winded book concerned with a civil war on Mars. Another Mars novel, this time dealing with benevolent Martians coming to Earth to. The War of the Worlds book. Read reviews from the world's largest community for readers. With H.G. Wells' other novels, The War of the Worlds was o. The War of The Worlds Book Cover. The Martians emerged and their appearance was like anything but men, being "big" and "greyish" with "oily brown skin", and.


War Of The Worlds Book

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The War of the Worlds (Dover Thrift Editions) [H. G. Wells] on kaz-news.info Browse our editors' picks for the best books of the month in fiction, nonfiction. War Of The Worlds [Wells H.G.] on kaz-news.info *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Book by H.G., Wells. The seminal masterpiece of alien invasion, The War of the Worlds () conjures a terrifying, tentacled race of Martians who earn your way to a free book!.

Yet across the gulf of space, minds that are to our minds as ours are to those of the beasts that perish, intellects vast and cool and unsympathetic, regarded this earth with envious eyes, and slowly and surely drew their plans against us. And early in the twentieth century came the great disillusionment.

The planet Mars, I scarcely need remind the reader, revolves about the sun at a mean distance of ,, miles, and the light and heat it receives from the sun is barely half of that received by this world. It must be, if the nebular hypothesis has any truth, older than our world; and long before this earth ceased to be molten, life upon its surface must have begun its course. The fact that it is scarcely one seventh of the volume of the earth must have accelerated its cooling to the temperature at which life could begin.

It has air and water and all that is necessary for the support of animated existence. Yet so vain is man, and so blinded by his vanity, that no writer, up to the very end of the nineteenth century, expressed any idea that intelligent life might have developed there far, or indeed at all, beyond its earthly level.

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Nor was it generally understood that since Mars is older than our earth, with scarcely a quarter of the superficial area and remoter from the sun, it necessarily follows that it is not only more distant from time's beginning but nearer its end.

The secular cooling that must someday overtake our planet has already gone far indeed with our neighbour. Its physical condition is still largely a mystery, but we know now that even in its equatorial region the midday temperature barely approaches that of our coldest winter. Its air is much more attenuated than ours, its oceans have shrunk until they cover but a third of its surface, and as its slow seasons change huge snowcaps gather and melt about either pole and periodically inundate its temperate zones.

That last stage of exhaustion, which to us is still incredibly remote, has become a present-day problem for the inhabitants of Mars.

The immediate pressure of necessity has brightened their intellects, enlarged their powers, and hardened their hearts. And looking across space with instruments, and intelligences such as we have scarcely dreamed of, they see, at its nearest distance only 35,, of miles sunward of them, a morning star of hope, our own warmer planet, green with vegetation and grey with water, with a cloudy atmosphere eloquent of fertility, with glimpses through its drifting cloud wisps of broad stretches of populous country and narrow, navy-crowded seas.

And we men, the creatures who inhabit this earth, must be to them at least as alien and lowly as are the monkeys and lemurs to us. The intellectual side of man already admits that life is an incessant struggle for existence, and it would seem that this too is the belief of the minds upon Mars. Their world is far gone in its cooling and this world is still crowded with life, but crowded only with what they regard as inferior animals. To carry warfare sunward is, indeed, their only escape from the destruction that, generation after generation, creeps upon them.

And before we judge of them too harshly we must remember what ruthless and utter destruction our own species has wrought, not only upon animals, such as the vanished bison and the dodo, but upon its inferior races.

The first falls near Woking and is regarded as a curiosity rather than a danger until the Martians climb out of it and kill many of the gaping crowd with a Heat-Ray. These unearthly creatures have heads four feet in diameter and colossal round bodies, and by manipulating two terrifying machines — the Handling Machine and the Fighting Machine — they are as versatile as humans and at the same time insuperable.

They cause boundless destruction. The inhabitants of the Earth are powerless against them, and it looks as if the end of the World has come. But there is one factor which the Martians, in spite of their superior intelligence, have not reckoned on.

It is this which brings about a miraculous conclusion to this famous work of the imagination. Get A Copy. Paperback , pages. Published March 12th by Modern Library first published May More Details Original Title.

Other Editions Friend Reviews. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about The War of the Worlds , please sign up. I know that this is a respected classic, but I didn't find it very enjoyable to read.

It lacked a certain something. Am I the only one who felt this way? Daniel Por This answer contains spoilers… view spoiler [ I think it's only fair to Wells to say that the utter simplicity of the bacteria killing the Martians, when all other human devices have failed, is …more I think it's only fair to Wells to say that the utter simplicity of the bacteria killing the Martians, when all other human devices have failed, is stunning and thought-provoking.

Wells also crafts suspense in many parts of the book, and this is also one of the reasons why I consider this book amazing and enjoyable to read. Is this the author's particular style or the way they wrote back then? I feel like every time something major happens, there's this reflection on how life felt really normal and it is kind of annoying me. Mackie H. G Wells is trying to make a point about British Imperialism through his book.

His goal is to show people how England's colonies might feel by …more H. His goal is to show people how England's colonies might feel by having the peaceful English countryside razed and innocent people slaughtered and the peoples inability to fight back against an immense foreign power.

The normality the Narrator feels with all of the violence holds a parallel to the violence used in colonies to keep the people under control, and how it became a common occurrence.

See all 12 questions about The War of the Worlds…. Lists with This Book. Community Reviews.

The War of the Worlds by H. G. Wells

Showing Rating details. More filters. Sort order. I acknowledge that I am one of the few people who actually enjoyed the recent "War of the Worlds" movie.

The reason for this has to do more with the original book than Tom Cruise or Steven Speilburg's tendency to wittle everything, including alien attacks, down to simple family problems. In a lot of ways, "War of the Worlds" was a close to dead-on adaptation of the original Victorian novel. Just a few words on why you should like, or if you don't like, respect "War of the Worlds" as a mov I acknowledge that I am one of the few people who actually enjoyed the recent "War of the Worlds" movie.

Just a few words on why you should like, or if you don't like, respect "War of the Worlds" as a movie: It avoids alien movie cliches: There are no characters Presidents, generals, etc.

You do not see a major city destroyed nor any iconic landmarks. Instead of humanity banding together to defeat a common foe, the characters and others they interact with are left increasingly fragmented and isolated. That being said, Speilburg's "War of the Worlds" adapts much of the plot line and themes from the original novel.

Instead of the s version which pits a united front against the aliens Cold War adapted , the original Victorian novel has a character travel isolated. Wells' narrater, like Tom Cruise, finds himself on a ferry-crossing, holed up with a panicked priest who conflated with the artillery-man, provides us with a freaky Tim Robbins.

Robbins even shares a few lines with the artillery-man. The ending is much the same, a kind of "Now what? And of course, Morgan Freeman's opening and closings, are practically word by word from the novel. The movie is also a great window into some of the novel's most important themes.

There is the dust, the annhilation of things we find familiar, clothing floats from the sky in mimic of office paper There is a pervading fear of complete and nonsensical annhiliation. Whereas the s adaption pits humanity against an enemy, the updated version worries itself with unknown enemies who spring from the ground.

This is the age of colonialism, afterall, and suddenly England is beset by a much more powerful force, unexpected, and completely foreign. The aliens take England's resources, kill off its people, and even cover the landscape with alien plant-life. And perhaps the most over-arching anxiety of all: Here we have evolution at its cruelest; then consume us drinking our blood like in Bram Stoker's Dracula.

Just when humanity seems at its lowest, nature kicks in and saves the day. The ending seems anti-climatic now, but you have to remember that H. Wells did not have a pop-reference that included Will Smith destroying the mother-ship. So my point is, "War of the Worlds" is an amazing book and good movie, and one can inform the other.

View all 24 comments. In Surrey, a professor is caught up in the invasion of Martians as they sweep through London and its surrounding boroughs after witnessing several explosion on the planet Mars at the Ottershaw observatory. We follow the un-named professor and his brother in first-person narrative, seeing through their eyes this invasion and the destruction caused. The air was full of sound, a deafening and confusing conflict of noises-the clangorous din of the Martians, the crash of falling houses, the thud of trees, fences, sheds flashing into flame, and the crackling and roaring of fire.

Dense black smoke was leaping up to mingle with the steam from the river, and as the Heat-Ray went to and fro over Weybridge its impact was marked by flashes of incandescent white, that gave place at once to a smoky dance of lurid flames.

The first thing one needs to reference is the radio adaptation of , which was narrated by Orson Welles and caused panic due to its news-bulletin style: Whilst reading the novel, there is no doubt that the imagery, style and prose of H. Wells purported this panic. It is written with such imagination that it's difficult not to imagine oneself standing on the side of a crater as Martians crawl sluggishly out of their spaceships.

It is not often that I can forgive a book its downfalls due to the time of its writing. It's all very well to accept that, for the most part, racism and sexism and things of that ilk were at many times in history acceptable behaviour, but enjoying a book from a period with those things in this day and age is a thing I find difficult to do.

However, in the case of The War of the Worlds I think it is vitally important to read the book with the exact time and place it was written in history to be lodged within your mind alongside every word you read. We have a primitive form of speculative fiction, the very foundations of what we now call science fiction. At the time, H. Wells was writing fiction that had scientific and imaginative leanings, but no-one would dare think that perhaps the fiction was not quite fiction after all.

There is little mention of the Martians weaponry or technology except when it is in use: We have primitive science, because that is what they had at the time of writing. Whilst the future may have been thought of, the idea of futuristic technology was as alien to them as the Martians and their technology are in the book.

So, the excitement of the scientific exploration of futures is not to be found here.

The War of the Worlds

But the imagination of Wells is so beyond almost everything else that was around at the time and coupling it with popular militarist fiction means that this is an extremely important novel in the progression of English fiction. It is not surprising that Wells was, like Darwin himself, stuck inextricably between the truth of science and the tradition of religion. The story itself, if put in perspective-removed from its time period and thought of solely as a novel-is nothing special.

The narrator is disjointed with his surroundings, the story disappointing in the way it ends and less dramatic and climactic than it could have been. The style of prose is lacking, the dialogue just standard and the characters just slight breezes on a warm day. In that, it would require a mere two or three stars: But this is a novel that should be remembered for when it was written.

The War of the Worlds (novel)

The imagination of a scientific man who is at odds with what is right and wrong. The spectacular birth of a new genre of, not only writing, but of thinking, too. The fact that even though my oestrogen levels were almost at zero, the reunion at the end made me cry my eyes out because it was written so perfectly, so unexpectedly.

Of course, that film with that actor was better. Of course it was. We have perspective and technology now that means the original The War of the Worlds is pretty pathetic. It cannot possibly compete with our high standards of today, unless you have half a brain and take this novel for what it truly represents.

View 1 comment. Ah, but I must not spoil the book even though I imagine most people reading this review all three of them already know how it ends. Which brings me to my next point, if you know the story of The War of The Worlds quite well already but have not actually read the book I urge you to read it, especially if you are a science fiction fan.

I don't think there are many books in the pantheon of sci-fi as important as this one. This is the book that launched the alien invasion sci-fi trope and even manages to remain one of the best examples of it. If historical importance is not much of an inducement for you and you are just looking for a thumping good read Mr.

Wells is also at your service here. The War of The Worlds is often thrilling, skillfully structured and narrated with some unexpected moments of philosophising and surreal dialogue. He even included some element of hard sf into his novels, here is an example from this book: Many think that in some way they are able to generate an intense heat in a chamber of practically absolute non-conductivity. This intense heat they project in a parallel beam against any object they choose, by means of a polished parabolic mirror of unknown composition, much as the parabolic mirror of a lighthouse projects a beam of light.

The slightly surreal chapter involving the artilleryman is a particularly interesting depiction of people who always seem to be brimming with ideas, plans and suggestions but never actually do anything. Still, even moderate panic is an amazing achievement for a radio drama. This book has of course been adapted into movies several times. Unfortunately a straight adaptation complete with the Victorian setting does not seem to have been made.

The most recent adaptation being the Spielberg directed movie with Tom Cruise being the usual Cruisian hero, dodging Martian heat rays like nobody's business. For this reread I went with the free Librivox audiobook version , very well read by Rebecca Dittman. Anyway, never dismiss H. Wells' sci-fi as old hat because he invented the hat and it is still superior to most of today's headgear. A quick note about the ending: Now the Beeb is making a proper Victorian era adaptation , hurrah!

View all 49 comments. Jan 04, Paul Bryant rated it really liked it Shelves: This was not anything like the Tom Cruise movie so be warned. Nor Stephen Spielberg either. Now this book version I think is not the book of the movie, I think it came first so that may explain why the movie is better, because really this book is lame. Yes more realistic because like the main guy is no Tom Cruise, but less action.

As for instance he sees the army get a lucky shot in and kill the one single Martian but then like his buddies just wipe out the whole British army. Boom, heatray zzzzz — GONE! Oh yeah the book is set in England which I thought was strange. Why not America like the movie? End of. So, in my opinion, I say watch the movie. Or you could go for the prog rock version, lol. Oh I guess I did give away the end.

But everybody knows this story. View all 20 comments. Sep 26, Leonard Gaya rated it it was amazing Shelves: Paraphrasing Whitehead, I would say that the safest general characterisation of the science-fiction tradition is that it consists of a series of footnotes to H.

Indeed, The War of the Worlds is probably the most influential novel of the whole science fiction genre, as well as a significant part of the horror category. I remember reading this short novel as a child and being viscerally engrossed and terrified. Rereading it now made me aware of a few more things. First I realised how thi Paraphrasing Whitehead, I would say that the safest general characterisation of the science-fiction tradition is that it consists of a series of footnotes to H.

First I realised how this book sums up and, in a way, accomplishes some of the things H. Wells had experimented before. Just to name a few: It is possible that H.

Though in hindsight, The War of the Worlds is much more than that. It is indeed the kernel and the seed of all the later tales of extraterrestrial invasion and tropes of apocalyptic destruction, from H. Lovecraft e. Clarke e. Childhood's End , Robert Heinlein e. The Puppet Masters , Ray Bradbury e. The Martian Chronicles , Arkady Strugatsky e.

Roadside Picnic , Margaret Atwood e. Oryx and Crake , Michael Faber e. Under the Skin , Cormac McCarthy e. The Road , Ted Chiang e.

Story of Your Life , Emily Mandel e.

Station Eleven , or Jeff VanderMeer e. Annihilation … Not to mention films and TV: What strikes me the most is the fact that Wells depicts humanity in the shoes of the invaded party, and pictures the invaders as an alien race of bloodthirsty mollusks — which, in itself, sounds like a veiled but stark criticism of Western imperialism and sense of superiority. Later still, when the Second World War began, and the Nazis were about to invade the whole of Europe, Orson Welles remembered this old tale about a Martian invasion and turned it into an incredibly relevant radio sensation.

The masses of refugees, described by H. Wells, fleeing the war in a disorderly and life-threatening manner is a sight anyone may witness even today, despite all the concrete walls or steel fences that are supposed to stop them. In short, this is an unavoidable masterpiece. The only reproach I could make is regarding the ending, where the deadly flu epidemic the Martians eventually suffer from feels a bit like a disappointing Deus ex Machina.

As a side note: Jeff Wayne produced a compelling musical version of The War of the Worlds in the s that would please any fan of Mike Oldfield. Rewatched the film adaptation. Steven Spielberg took a few liberties with the book, setting the story in present-day Connecticut. One very clever unfaithfulness, however, is having the aliens not come from Mars, but from underground a nod to The Time Machine , no doubt.

But this is an outright nightmarish and nail-biting take on what had once been a benevolent musical spaceship or a heart-warming horticultural E. Some scenes, like the innumerable bodies suddenly floating down a glistening river, or the empty cloths raining from a blazing sky are strangely beautiful and horrifying. In the midst of the gruesome devastation, Tom Cruise, Tim Robbins and Dakota Fanning are exceptional, playing the parts of regular people, suddenly overwhelmed with PTSD and facing the brutal ending of all things.

View all 10 comments. I hadn't read this classic ! And also my literary diet needs more classics. And you know? I'm glad I did. The War of the Worlds is a lot more thoughtfully written than I had remembered. In between deadly heat rays, huge tripod machines striding around the country killing everything in their path, and b I hadn't read this classic ! In between deadly heat rays, huge tripod machines striding around the country killing everything in their path, and bloodthirsty Martians trying to take over Earth starting with Great Britain , there's critique of colonialism, religious hypocrisy, and even how humans treat animals.

The way people react in a crisis is given just as much attention as the Martians' actions. Upping my rating from 3 stars to 4. February group read with the Non-Crunchy Classics Pantaloonless crew. View all 17 comments. Feb 03, Evgeny rated it really liked it Shelves: Ladies and gentlemen, I shall read you a wire addressed to Professor Pierson from Dr.

Seismograph registered shock of almost earthquake intensity occurring within a radius of twenty miles of Princeton. Please investigate. Professor Pierson, could this occurrence possibly have something to do with the disturbances observed on the planet Mars?

Martians are com Ladies and gentlemen, I shall read you a wire addressed to Professor Pierson from Dr. Martians are coming!!! Run for your lives!!! Hey, what has Orson Welles got that I have not got? Now that I scared you let us go back to the review. This is one of the best known science fiction stories of H. In case you somehow missed it the book tells the tale of Martian invasion on Earth.

These guys decided Mars became too cold, but luckily they have a really nice cozy planet practically next door: They came and proceeded to beat the crap out of humans using so-called heat ray which strongly reminds laser weapons, except that laser was not invented at the time of the book publication. And so the fashion show I mean total destruction of humanity began starting with British Islands I found it strange that Martian decided this place was the best landing point; by pure laws of probability Russian Empire was the obvious candidate just because they had the largest territory.

Other than being the fist book that introduced the idea of alien invasion since that time beaten to the death and beyond by pulp media and aforementioned laser there are quite a few interesting themes in here if you read carefully: It might be the very first dystopian novel written way before the term came to be. I freely admit that the book is great, but personally I like both The time Machine and The Invisible Man better simply because I am not a big fan of dystopia.

This is the only reason for one less star of the otherwise perfect rating. Who would have thought Martians were anti-vaxers? View all 8 comments. Distintas maneras de pensar nos llevan a un contrapunto interesante.

En el caso del artillero, se desarrolla una personalidad completamente opuesta. I had to watch it each and every time it played on television. The same running dialogue would go on inside my head: It was a combination of a yodel and the sound the cat would make when its tail would get caught under the rocking chair. Get your asses back to Mars, bitches. For Wells, this was a pioneering book, its tropes were to be dug up and used over and over again.

Wells does here as Wells does in his other books — throws in some social commentary: View all 7 comments. Oct 01, Nayra. You would think that as Man grows in intelligence he would likewise grow in morality. But you would be wrong. Or at least, that is what history teaches us. Wells made much the same observation.

At the end of The War of the Worlds , the unnamed narrator returns to his house and sees the paper he had been working on before the war began. As with much science fiction, the aliens in The War of the Worlds reveal more about us than about them.

Throughout the book, Wells compares Man with the lower animals. And it becomes increasingly uncomfortable. When he discovers that the Martians regard human beings as food, he is able to shift his perspective and see the human diet from the point of view of an animal that is typically regarded as food: Moreover, it is not only animals that we destroy.

Other humans are also fair game.

The Tasmanians, in spite of their human likeness, were entirely swept out of existence in a war of extermination waged by European immigrants, in the space of fifty years. Are we such apostles of mercy as to complain if the Martians warred in the same spirit? If only moral growth went hand-in-hand with intellectual growth! So a look at the Martians is a look into a mirror. It is also a look into our own future. And it is a future difficult to look upon.

The Martians are ugly. And not just on the outside. Evolution has turned them into little more than heads. Thanks to natural selection, their bodies function with marvelous efficiency. They need not eat, sleep, or engage in sexual intercourse.

They communicate by telepathy. Through Darwinian adaptation, they lost what they did not need to survive and developed what they did need.

And what they needed was intellect, not character. Heads, not hearts. Is this where our species is headed? Wells was an advocate of Darwinism and if the Martians represent the future of Man, then The War of the Worlds must be read as a cautionary tale. The Epilogue supports this interpretation: Should we conquer?

On the contrary, we had better learn compassion for those over whom our superior intelligence gives us power. View all 9 comments. Feb 01, Carmen rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: Anyone; Vegans. No one would have believed in the last years of the nineteenth century that this world was being watched keenly and closely by intelligences greater than man's and yet as mortal as our own; that as men busied themselves about their various concerns they were scrutinised and studied, perhaps almost as narrowly as a man with a microscope might scrutinise the transient creatures that swarm and multiply in a drop of water.

With infinite complacency men went to and fro over this globe about their lit No one would have believed in the last years of the nineteenth century that this world was being watched keenly and closely by intelligences greater than man's and yet as mortal as our own; that as men busied themselves about their various concerns they were scrutinised and studied, perhaps almost as narrowly as a man with a microscope might scrutinise the transient creatures that swarm and multiply in a drop of water.

With infinite complacency men went to and fro over this globe about their little affairs, serene in their assurance of their empire over matter. It is possible that the infusoria under the microscope do the same. No one gave a thought to the older worlds of space as sources of human danger, or thought of them only to dismiss the idea of life upon them as impossible or improbable.

It is curious to recall some of the mental habits of those departed days. At most, terrestrial men fancied there might be other men upon Mars, perhaps inferior to themselves and ready to welcome a missionary enterprise. Yet across the gulf of space, minds that are to our minds as ours are to those of the beasts that perish, intellects vast and cool and unsympathetic, regarded this earth with envious eyes, and slowly and surely drew their plans against us. And early in the twentieth century came the great disillusionment.

Hmmmmm, how fucking amazing is this? Very enjoyable. The book loses something when it adopts our MC telling us about his experiences during the invasion, but Wells rescues himself with some breathtaking breakdowns of morality, ethics, war horrors, and survival. Not to mention class differences.

Wells is also, like Faber in Under the Skin , using aliens and science fiction to push a vegan agenda. Wells was not pushing a vegan agenda. I mean, surely vegans must get tired of what can sometimes be self-righteous and pompous propaganda which exists in vegan non-fiction. Not to mention it is often fucking depressing, especially the books that talk about the suffering of animals in graphic detail.

Even if something like veganism was not popular in Wells time and place, you can easily see how this is a vegan book. The book makes some what must be at the time: This is a book like The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde which, when you read it now, it seems like old hat, but in its day must have just blown people away with its radical concepts. Imagine humans NOT being the masters of all they survey. That's what we are dealing with here, and it cannot be denied that Wells revolutionized and charged the genre of science-fiction much the way Mary Shelley did with her revolutionary, mind-blowing Frankenstein.

It's so old-fashioned. It's nothing like the media trained you to think it was. It's slow, it's old. But you have to understand that at the time, these authors were completely slaying people's long-held beliefs and way of thinking. I loved both and think they are still very arresting and relevant today. Amazing first chapter that blows you out of the water. And we men, the creatures who inhabit this earth, must be to them at least as alien and lowly as are the monkeys and lemurs to us.

The intellectual side of man already admits that life is an incessant struggle for existence, and it would seem that this too is the belief of the minds upon Mars. Their world is far gone in its cooling and this world is still crowded with life, but crowded only with what they regard as inferior animals. To carry warfare sunward is, indeed, their only escape from the destruction that, generation after generation, creeps upon them.

And before we judge them too harshly we must remember what ruthless and utter destruction our own species has wrought, not only upon animals, such as the vanished bison and the dodo, but upon its inferior races. Think of everything humanity does to animals, and the genocide, war, and slavery it inflicts on other human beings. Wells keeps bringing this up throughout the novel in a rare show of clear-eyed thinking about humanity, especially for an Englishman in Now, the book loses something when we start following our MC around and experiencing the invasion with him.

But the book saves itself in a few ways. One, Wells's writing. Few people realise the immensity of vacancy in which the dust of the material universe swims. Those who have never seen a living Martian can scarcely imagine the strange horror of its appearance.

He's got a lot of good writing in this book and some great turns of phrase. Secondly, he decides not only to take down humanity's vanity and confidence, but also seeks to offer commentary on religion, class differences, and morality and ethics especially in the context of war. It's staggering how much he chooses to bite off here, but such takedowns engage the reader throughout the book. He also doesn't skimp on the horror - not only the horrors and ravages of war, but the horror of the aliens and what they do to humans.

It's honestly terrifying and Wells successfully scared me and made me disgusted. I think he made his MC deliberately a member of the intelligentsia instead of a soldier, because - let me tell you - this book would have been completely different if told from the POV of someone who was a combat veteran.

And that's on purpose. As the soldier he meets points out to him, after you've seen some shit then shit isn't as shocking. Most of the people were hard at it, squealing and exciting themselves. But I'm not so fond of squealing. I've been in sight of death once or twice; I'm not an ornamental soldier, and at the best and worst, death - it's just death. And it's the man that keeps on thinking comes through. It may seem cliched or old hat NOW, but you have to realize it was mindblowing back then.

I'm not saying that just because a book has cultural relevance and significance and is a classic in its genre that it's automatically good. Because I don't believe in that shit. Instead, I found myself actually enjoying and liking this book.

That doesn't happen to me with every classic. Not every classic holds up. I understand that old-fashioned books, language, and plotting can be boring and stupid to modern readers.

And there are classics that come off that way to me, as well. So YMMV. I've certainly read classics that I've absolutely hated, and this might be one of those for you as well. While reading this book it seemed achingly familiar to me. I think I've probably read this before.

Maybe a decade ago or so, I don't know. It's also possible that this book is SO entrenched in pop culture that I just thought I'd read it, but I don't think so. But I'm going to list it here as my first reading since I can't specifically remember reading it before. I like Wells's points here. Not atheist, but a super interesting viewpoint of his time, cackling that 'God is not an insurance agent' and surmising that it's equally likely that humanity's new Martian masters also pray to God and expect God's protection.

His analysis of the terrible things people find themselves doing to survive, and if that can be forgiven or not when normality is restored. Those who have escaped the dark and terrible aspects of life will find my brutality, my flash of rage in our final tragedy, easy enough to blame; for they know what is wrong as well as any, but not what is possible to tortured men. But those who have been under the shadow, who have gone down at last to elemental things, will have a wider charity.

I mean, take your pick, he just slays here with his cultural and social commentary. I find him lacking and tone-deaf on the plight of women, but I can't have everything. At least not from this author.

Reading the sci-fi and horror classics can be very illuminating and oftentimes rewarding. That was the case here. Although it isn't perfect, I am still giving it five stars. With some caveats. Also, I want to restate that this won't be for everyone.

Strange night! Strangest in this, that so soon as dawn had come, I, who had talked with God, crept out of the house like a rat leaving its hiding place - a creature scarcely larger, an inferior animal, a thing that for any passing whim of our masters might be hunted and killed. Perhaps they also prayed confidently to God. Surely, if we have learned nothing else, this war has taught us pity - pity for those witless souls that suffer our dominion.

View all 26 comments. May 11, Denisse rated it it was amazing Recommended to Denisse by: Read for the Reading Challenge: Not just very interesting for all the technology and science it has, but outstanding in describing human behavior and criticizing Victorian society. Very thrilling at parts, philosophically emotional at others and well written.

Highly recommended for any sci-fi fan. The ending might be a Read for the Reading Challenge: The ending might be a little Deus Ex Machina for some, but I love simple endings that make sense. Wells indeed a very good storyteller. Hay ciertas escenas bastante asquerosas de imaginar. La escritura es bastante intensa de una forma muy inteligente y sin sobredramatismo. Lean el libro!Topics HG Wells Classics corner. There was, however, some criticism of the brutal nature of the events in the narrative.

JHU Press. When they discover the haughty Earth-centric views of Earth philosophers, they are greatly amused by how important Earth beings think they are compared to greater beings in the universe such as themselves.

Yet across the gulf of space, minds that are to our minds as ours are to those of the beasts that perish, intellects vast and cool and unsympathetic, regarded this earth with envious eyes, and slowly and surely drew their plans against us. The narrator is a middle-class writer of philosophical papers, somewhat reminiscent of Doctor Kemp in The Invisible Man , with characteristics similar to author Wells at the time of writing.