RISK ASSESSMENT PDF

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For some risks, other regulations require particular control measures. Your assessment can help you identify where you need to look at certain risks and these. PDF | On Dec 10, , J.E. Rovins and others published Risk Assessment Handbook. Risk assessment is a technique for proactively identifying and addressing risks in all settings. It is a key tool for effective risk management both in the context of.


Risk Assessment Pdf

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The Health and Safety Executive's Five steps to risk assessment. Step 1: Identify the hazards. Walk around your venue and look at what could reasonably be. A risk assessment is an important step in protecting your workers and your business, as well as complying with the law. It helps you focus on the risks that. OIE International Animal Health Code. • The risk assessment includes the following steps: – Release assessment: description of biological.

What type of risk analysis measures will be used e. Who are the stakeholders involved e. What relevant laws, regulations, codes, or standards may apply in your jurisdiction, as well as organizational policies and procedures.

In general, to do an assessment, you should: Identify hazards. Determine the likelihood of harm, such as an injury or illness occurring, and its severity.

Health and safety risk assessment

Consider normal operational situations as well as non-standard events such as maintenance, shutdowns, power outages, emergencies, extreme weather, etc. Review all available health and safety information about the hazard such as Safety Data Sheet SDS , manufacturers literature, information from reputable organizations, results of testing, workplace inspection reports, records of workplace incidents accidents , including information about the type and frequency of the occurrence, illnesses, injuries, near misses, etc.

Understand the minimum legislated requirements for your jurisdiction. Identify actions necessary to eliminate the hazard, or control the risk using the hierarchy of risk control methods. Evaluate to confirm if the hazard has been eliminated or if the risk is appropriately controlled.

Monitor to make sure the control continues to be effective. Keep any documents or records that may be necessary. Documentation may include detailing the process used to assess the risk, outlining any evaluations, or detailing how conclusions were made.

When doing an assessment, also take into account: The methods and procedures used in the processing, use, handling or storage of the substance, etc. The actual and the potential exposure of workers e. The measures and procedures necessary to control such exposure by means of engineering controls, work practices, and hygiene practices and facilities.

The duration and frequency of the task how long and how often a task is done. The location where the task is done. The machinery, tools, materials, etc. Any possible interactions with other activities in the area and if the task could affect others e. The lifecycle of the product, process or service e.

The education and training the workers have received. How a person would react in a particular situation e. To be sure that all hazards are found: Look at all aspects of the work. Include non-routine activities such as maintenance, repair, or cleaning. Include people who work off site either at home, on other job sites, drivers, teleworkers, with clients, etc.

Look at the way the work is organized or done include experience of people doing the work, systems being used, etc. Look at foreseeable unusual conditions for example: Determine whether a product, machine or equipment can be intentionally or unintentionally changed e. Review all of the phases of the lifecycle.

Examine risks to visitors or the public. Consider the groups of people that may have a different level of risk such as young or inexperienced workers, persons with disabilities, or new or expectant mothers. It may help to create a chart or table such as the following: To research the hazard, you can look at: Past experience knowledge from workers, etc.

Health and safety material about the hazard such as safety data sheets SDSs , research studies, or other manufacturer information. Information from reputable organizations. Results of testing atmospheric or air sampling of workplace, biological swabs, etc. The expertise of an occupational health and safety professional. Information about previous injuries, illnesses, near misses, incident reports, etc. Observation of the process or task.

Remember to include factors that contribute to the level of risk such as: The work environment layout, condition, etc. The systems of work being used. The range of foreseeable conditions. The way the source may cause harm e. How often and how much a person will be exposed. This is followed by identification of visible and implied hazards that may threaten the project, and determining the qualitative nature of the potential adverse consequences of each hazard.

Without a potential adverse consequence, there is no hazard. It is also necessary to identify the potential parties or assets which may be affected by the threat, and the potential consequences to them if the hazard is activated. If the consequences are dependent on dose, i.

This is the general case for many health hazards where the mechanism of injury is toxicity or repetitive injury, particularly where the effect is cumulative. For other hazards, the consequences may either occur or not, and the severity may be extremely variable even when the triggering conditions are the same.

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This is typical of many biological hazards as well as a large range of safety hazards. Exposure to a pathogen may or may not result in actual infection, and the consequences of infection may also be variable.

Similarly a fall from the same place may result in minor injury or death, depending on unpredictable details. In these cases estimates must be made of reasonably likely consequences and associated probability of occurrence.

In cases where statistical records are available they may be used to evaluate risk, but in many cases there are no data or insufficient data available to be useful. Mathematical or experimental models may provide useful input. The complexity of this step in many contexts derives mainly from the need to extrapolate results from experimental animals e. In addition, the differences between individuals due to genetics or other factors mean that the hazard may be higher for particular groups, called susceptible populations.

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An alternative to dose-response estimation is to determine a concentration unlikely to yield observable effects, that is, a no effect concentration. In developing such a dose, to account for the largely unknown effects of animal to human extrapolations, increased variability in humans, or missing data, a prudent approach is often adopted by including safety or uncertainty factors in the estimate of the "safe" dose, typically a factor of 10 for each unknown step.

Exposure Quantification, aims to determine the amount of a contaminant dose that individuals and populations will receive, either as a contact level e. This is done by examining the results of the discipline of exposure assessment. As different location, lifestyles and other factors likely influence the amount of contaminant that is received, a range or distribution of possible values is generated in this step.

Particular care is taken to determine the exposure of the susceptible population s. The results of these steps are combined to produce an estimate of risk.

Because of the different susceptibilities and exposures, this risk will vary within a population. An uncertainty analysis is usually included in a health risk assessment. Dynamic risk assessment[ edit ] During an emergency response, the situation and hazards are often inherently less predictable than for planned activities non-linear.

In general, if the situation and hazards are predictable linear , standard operating procedures should deal with them adequately. In some emergencies this may also hold true, with the prepared and trained responses being adequate to manage the situation.

In these situations, the operator can manage risk without outside assistance, or with the assistance of a backup team who are prepared and available to step in at short notice. Other emergencies occur where there is no previously planned protocol, or when an outsider group is brought in to handle the situation, and they are not specifically prepared for the scenario that exists but must deal with it without undue delay. Examples include police, fire department, disaster response and other public service rescue teams.

In these cases ongoing risk assessment by the involved personnel can advise appropriate action to reduce risk. It relies on experience, training and continuing education, including effective debriefing to analyse not only what went wrong, but also what went right, and why, and to share this with other members of the team and the personnel responsible for the planning level risk assessment.

Some of these are listed here. General health[ edit ] There are many resources that provide health risk information. The National Library of Medicine provides risk assessment and regulation information tools for a varied audience. Understand the minimum legislated requirements for your jurisdiction.

Identify actions necessary to eliminate the hazard, or control the risk using the hierarchy of risk control methods. Evaluate to confirm if the hazard has been eliminated or if the risk is appropriately controlled. Monitor to make sure the control continues to be effective.

Keep any documents or records that may be necessary. Documentation may include detailing the process used to assess the risk, outlining any evaluations, or detailing how conclusions were made. When doing an assessment, also take into account: The methods and procedures used in the processing, use, handling or storage of the substance, etc.

Risk Assessment

The actual and the potential exposure of workers e. The measures and procedures necessary to control such exposure by means of engineering controls, work practices, and hygiene practices and facilities. The duration and frequency of the task how long and how often a task is done.

The location where the task is done. The machinery, tools, materials, etc. Any possible interactions with other activities in the area and if the task could affect others e. The lifecycle of the product, process or service e. The education and training the workers have received.

How a person would react in a particular situation e. It is important to remember that the assessment must take into account not only the current state of the workplace but any potential situations as well.

By determining the level of risk associated with the hazard, the employer, and the health and safety committee where appropriate , can decide whether a control program is required and to what level. See a sample risk assessment form. How are the hazards identified? Overall, the goal is to find and record possible hazards that may be present in your workplace.

It may help to work as a team and include both people familiar with the work area, as well as people who are not - this way you have both the experienced and fresh eye to conduct the inspection. In either case, the person or team should be competent to carry out the assessment and have good knowledge about the hazard being assessed, any situations that might likely occur, and protective measures appropriate to that hazard or risk.

To be sure that all hazards are found: Look at all aspects of the work. Include non-routine activities such as maintenance, repair, or cleaning. Include people who work off site either at home, on other job sites, drivers, teleworkers, with clients, etc.

Look at the way the work is organized or done include experience of people doing the work, systems being used, etc.It may help to create a chart or table such as the following: Hazard control methods are often grouped into the following categories:. The workplace assessment checklists though is only available in English.

Is the risk controlled effectively, or is further action required? It is necessary to determine whether this 0. Before new processes or activities are introduced.