KILLER HOME RECORDING PDF

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Home Recording For Musicians For Dummies®, 5th Edition. Published Part I: Getting Started with Home Recording. Creating a Killer Keyboard Sound. This is a pdf book series with audio downloads by a guy named Brandon Drury called Killer Home Recording. Have any of you bought this?. Recording Cheat Sheet. The Difference Between Home Demos and Pro Mixes You don't need to know EVERYTHING about recording and mixing in order to produce Kill the reverb in the room with acoustic treatment. ○ Use mattresses.


Killer Home Recording Pdf

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With the advent of today's gear, a musician can set up a home recording You can also tie the power supply into a simple kill switch at your recording desk. Jeff Strong is the author of Home Recording for Musicians For Dummies as They key to a killer keyboard sound is making sure that you get the sound. Killer Home Recording, as well as all other products I made for RecordingReview .com, are now Maybe someone knows of a clever PDF-to-Epub conversion.

I try to time the release in time with the beat so that the compressor has stopped compressing before the next hit.

EQ and Compression are the first processors for any mix session. Snare Drum Sound Partner in crime with the kick drum, the snare drum is the other defining rhythmic factor to the song. EQ EQ-wise, there is not an awful lot you need below Hz so that you can start by high-pass filtering all the low end away.

The body of the snare can be brought forward with a little boost at around Hz if you feel like it lacks some thickness. I like thick snares, so I often catch myself adding a little weight to the snare around that area.

If your snare has ringing frequencies that you find annoying, you can try pinpointing them by boosting a particular frequency band with a high Q and sweeping the spectrum until they pop out. I find that sometimes the snare needs a little cut in the mids, either resulting from boxiness at — Hz or too much of a nasal attack from the area around 1 kHz. Enhance the attack of the snare with a broad boost around 2 — 4 kHz and search for the sizzle of the snares in the higher frequencies.

Compression Like I do with the bass drum, I try to make the snare compress in time with the song. By timing the attack and release, I can get a nice steady snare sound that breathes with each hit. I generally leave the attack at a medium to slow setting so that the snap of the snare is unaffected, and time the release so that it stops compressing just in time for the next hit. I start with a ratio of , often going way higher as it depends on the genre how hard I want the compressor to be pumping.

You can adjust the threshold so that it is only lightly compressing the peaks for a subtle sound, or you can push the threshold down harder for a heavily compressed sound.

Snare compression is perhaps one of the most argued about subjects in audio production. Reverb You can create an entirely different snare sound by just applying an interesting reverb to it. Are you going to add a bright plate reverb to make it stand out, or will you be mixing it into a particular room mode like a small room sound?

Get them punchy with EQ. The best way to EQ toms is to find the unflattering frequencies with your equalizer. Normally, these are the middle frequencies, from — kHz or so.

Find the boxy and unwanted frequencies, cut them out and then add low-end power and high-end punch as needed. When mixing drums like toms, sometimes you need to finely cut a few adjacent frequencies instead of scooping out a big portion of the frequency spectrum. Compressing By adding a generous amount of compression to your toms, you can get a larger than life sound out of them. You can fatten them up considerably with some tight compression, and with the addition of a little reverb, you can make them sound huge and powerful.

The same rule of subtle compression applies as well to toms if you only want to control the peaks and lightly color their signal.

Overheads The overheads might be the most valuable microphones on the kit. The overheads are supposed to pick up every drum and give a complete sound to your drum kit. By adding the overheads to the mix early on, you can get a better sense of the full sound of the kit, making your drum mixing easier.

By adjusting the overheads with the rest of the close-miked drums, you can get a different sound. By focusing on the overheads you can get a roomier sound, but if you want a close in-your-face drum sound, you would rather use the overheads as complementary to the rest of the drums, mainly using them to accent the cymbal sounds. The Hi-Hat Mixing drums is a selective process, meaning that individual elements of the drum-kit only need specific frequency ranges.

While they may look cool, consoles like these are now collecting dust in top-tier studios across the globe. A digital audio workstation, or DAW, is the software that will power your home recording studio.

In fact, all DAWs sound exactly the same. The differences between them have more to do with workflow than anything else. Pro Tools excels as a recording platform. Its audio-editing features are second-to-none. Logic is the preferred choice for many producers. It features a fantastic library of sounds and plugins—one of the most comprehensive packages available.

Ableton Live is great for loop and sample-based producers. In fact, many EDM producers swear by it. Its audio manipulation tools are flexible and innovative, and it can be easily integrated into a live performance. If I was an electronic music producer, Ableton Live would be my choice.

Choosing a DAW is like dating.

Download a few trial versions and take them for a spin. Explore your options and make sure things fit before committing. While all major DAWs have similar features, some do certain things better than others. But in the end, the choice is yours.

Home Recording Studio: Build It like the Pros

Remember, The Beatles recorded Sgt. Pepper on a 4-track tape machine. Even the most basic DAW has infinitely more power.

Go with your gut and move on. These are pieces of third-party software that extend the functionality of your DAW. They allow you to manipulate sound in different ways. Most people invest in plugins too early. Go for quality here. Cheap, flimsy stands will be the bane of your existence. I prefer ones with three legs over those with a circular, weighted base. What I Recommend: A mesh screen that sits between your microphone and vocalist. This essential accessory will significantly improve the quality of your tracks.

For a pop filter to work well, there needs to be a few inches between the filter and the mic, as well as the filter and the singer. This is an easy move that will lead to a significant improvement in sound quality. You can use it to fill out and orchestrate your recordings. You may have a desk that works already. This is what I use in my home recording studio now.

Every decision you make while recording will be based on what you hear. This will lead to recordings that sound good in your studio, but fall apart on other speakers. You can avoid this by setting up your home recording studio properly. Your recordings will sound better too! These will improve the sound of your room by evening out acoustic problems.

There will be nothing more satisfying than hearing your own recordings play over the speakers in your new home studio. You now have everything you need to make this happen. The next step is for you to take action.

Order the equipment you need, set up your room using the guidelines above, and start recording! Remember, once you get all this out of the way, you can get on to the good stuff—making great music! But before you go, leave a comment below and tell me—what will you use your home recording studio for? This is a guest blog written by Jason Moss.

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Jason is an LA-based mixer, producer and engineer. Check out his mixing tips at Behind The Speakers. The Complete Guide.

Kevin Cornell on February 09, Table Of Contents: Sign Up Laptop Or Desktop? PC Or Mac? By timing the attack and release, I can get a nice steady snare sound that breathes with each hit. I generally leave the attack at a medium to slow setting so that the snap of the snare is unaffected, and time the release so that it stops compressing just in time for the next hit.

I start with a ratio of , often going way higher as it depends on the genre how hard I want the compressor to be pumping. You can adjust the threshold so that it is only lightly compressing the peaks for a subtle sound, or you can push the threshold down harder for a heavily compressed sound.

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Snare compression is perhaps one of the most argued about subjects in audio production. Reverb You can create an entirely different snare sound by just applying an interesting reverb to it.

Are you going to add a bright plate reverb to make it stand out, or will you be mixing it into a particular room mode like a small room sound? Get them punchy with EQ. The best way to EQ toms is to find the unflattering frequencies with your equalizer. Normally, these are the middle frequencies, from — kHz or so. Find the boxy and unwanted frequencies, cut them out and then add low-end power and high-end punch as needed.

When mixing drums like toms, sometimes you need to finely cut a few adjacent frequencies instead of scooping out a big portion of the frequency spectrum. Compressing By adding a generous amount of compression to your toms, you can get a larger than life sound out of them. You can fatten them up considerably with some tight compression, and with the addition of a little reverb, you can make them sound huge and powerful.

The same rule of subtle compression applies as well to toms if you only want to control the peaks and lightly color their signal. Overheads The overheads might be the most valuable microphones on the kit.

The overheads are supposed to pick up every drum and give a complete sound to your drum kit. By adding the overheads to the mix early on, you can get a better sense of the full sound of the kit, making your drum mixing easier. By adjusting the overheads with the rest of the close-miked drums, you can get a different sound. By focusing on the overheads you can get a roomier sound, but if you want a close in-your-face drum sound, you would rather use the overheads as complementary to the rest of the drums, mainly using them to accent the cymbal sounds.

The Hi-Hat Mixing drums is a selective process, meaning that individual elements of the drum-kit only need specific frequency ranges. You only need a particular frequency range from the hi-hat. Considering that the hi-hat microphone is probably picking up a lot of bleed from other drums, some heavy high-pass filtering is in order.

So if your hi-hat needs a little more bto it, you will have to sacrifice that aggressive filtering. Like everything else, just filter until you start hearing the sound becoming compromised and then back off a little bit.

Cutting at 1Khz can reduce the cheap jangly sound from the hi-hat, but you can enhance and give it some sparkle with a boost from 7 kHz or so. Use a high shelving EQ if you want to enhance the high end with some area. Room Mics Room microphones give a different sound to the drum kit than the regular overhead mics.

Depending on the sound of the room, these room mics can either sound amazing or horrible. With a nice room mic picking up the complete kit we can try a few different techniques. We can apply some heavy compression to the room mics to get an even punchier sound.This damping effect has a major impact on the sound transmission properties of glass at high frequencies, especially near its critical frequency.

We also use resilient channel with sound-batt insulation for the master bedroom. You may not be able to soundproof your room, but there are plenty of treatments you can use to improve its sound that are nondestructive in nature. Listen to the beat and have it tell you what the most important part is. Plus, you need to understand that panel resonance is affected at lower frequencies and coincidence at higher frequencies.

You can also layer the samples with the original drums, giving you the best of both worlds. If it does, then locate a line about 2' inside of your room from the existing line.

Symmetry, in a Control Room is critical to proper stereo imaging.