DAISY MILLER BOOK

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Daisy Miller is a novella by Henry James that first appeared in Cornhill Magazine in June–July , and in book form the following year. It portrays the courtship. Originally published in The Cornhill Magazine in and in book form in , Daisy Miller brought Henry James his first widespread commercial and critical. DAISY MILLER: A STUDY IN TWO PARTS. PART I. At the little town of Vevey, in Switzerland, there is a par- ticularly comfortable hotel. There are, indeed, many.


Daisy Miller Book

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Daisy Miller [Henry Jr. James] on kaz-news.info *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Daisy Miller is Henry James's classic story of a young American woman. Novel by Henry James, published in Cornhill Magazine in and published in book form in The book's title character is a young American woman. Travelling in Europe with her family, Daisy Miller, an exquisitely beautiful young American woman, presents her Sold by: Book Depository US. Have one to sell .

People want to say the author is trying to undermine the constraints put on women, by showing how sad it is when a vivacious young lady gets beaten down. Surely Daisy Miller herself is the only even faintly likable character in this book, isn't she? Isn't the narrator, Winterbourne, just a dreadful little tightassed shit? All he does is, like, "She's so naughty!

And yet I want her! But yet - she's so naughty! The closest he gets to horny is pointing out that she has a cute little nose. Winterbourne sniffs of one that he's "anything but a gentleman; he isn't even a very plausible imitation of one. Hardy's always throwing these wild dramatic scenes in epic settings. Of course James doesn't have any idea what to do once he gets all his characters there - Henry James wouldn't know a dramatic scene if it gave him a handjob in a dark alley - so they all just sortof lurk about and then go home.

Winterbourne feels shocked about her judgment. Daisy is soon to feel something else. That's Cybill Shepherd looking sassy there "I've never allowed a gentleman to dictate to me or to interfere with anything I do," says Daisy, and do you feel excitement or dread when she says it?

Henry James is a subtle and careful writer, and it's like him to leave it murky whose side he's on. Maybe it's judgey old Winterbourne who's naughty!

But here's my thing: I do think we should maybe admit that there are a lot of these books, and surely all of the writers can't be trying to undermine, right?

Or else what would they even be undermining? The most seriously subversive books up above were written by women. And in any case books have characters but they also have plots, and plots matter. That old asshole Philip Roth used to say, "The thought of the novelist lies not in the remarks of his characters or even in their introspection, but in the plight he has invented for his characters. What comes for Daisy Miller?

She catches malaria at the Colosseum - Rome was just lousy with malaria at the time, so being there at night actually was a little dumb - and she dies. Murdered by flirting! And just as a general rule: Feb 01, Stephen P rated it really liked it Recommended to Stephen by: Kalliope spurred on this review that was never to be.

Ah Daisy. What to do with you. You scuttle about this novel innocent, coquettish, a young pretty American in a foreign land. Neither to James or to me. Even your name sounds fresh, innocent. Of course the narrator is too stiff for you, caught in his own web of threaded conce Ah Daisy. Of course the narrator is too stiff for you, caught in his own web of threaded concealments barricaded against the throb of his own heart. But the Roman? Handsome and pliable. A remainder to keep and mold.

A lingering phantasm. And about James? He is a well known author you know. You were in good hands. Set down debutant-ish, and through your naivety and good looks much was to happen to and for you. When was it Daisy? When did you take the reigns from James, the master, and from me and what is now looking back my metronomed reading of comforting expectations. Did James know about it? Maybe up to a point. Or not.

Poor James. Poor me. Fools that we are. You had no intention of, being deeded by a man as a parcel of property to be owned, of a society to set you to work to climb into the tiered class above through fools tricks, nor by family name or the interworking of family constrictions, and certainly not by a reader who now has to reformulate this buzzing readerly world and recompose himself with a new idol.

A gleaming freedom fighter. So, why did James kill you off? He can be, you know, a bitter old man. One possibility I think is that you went your own way leaving him with his masterly pen in his masterly hand.

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He was pissed. The only means of gaining control of you and the story, your story, was to kill you. But could it have also been a cautionary tale James was trying to work out? That if you fly too close to the sun your stalwart wings will be seared? It is moving towards death as soon as it is, if not cared for, or even so… You left him flailing with your meteoric rise to the heights of universal hero battling for what freedom we can have, which is why his ending this tale in your absence seemed something tacked on both hollowing the story out and weighing it down.

View all 12 comments. Nov 09, Frona rated it liked it. To condemn values of victorian origin it is necessary to demonstrate that they cannot overcome some of their essential antagonisms.

If a critique of questionable morals is the intention of this book, the second part is more vauge, since it lacks any struggle worth struggeling for. We get to meet a young woman without many redeeming qualities that lives only to charm man-kind. She fights for nothing but her right to annoy, which meets some reservations among others, readers as well. If the author's intention was to show that any person, no matter how superfluous she may be, deserves freedom and acceptance, it would be a wonderful book, with all the steady rythm and clarity of style.

But he seems to claim the opposite - all that lies under the petty social judgments are some innocent actions performed by harmless girls, and so such social standards are worthless. And although he tries to make a tragic hero out of her, he lets her stand out only in her poise, for her mind stays old-fashioned, as men remain her only interest. Maybe that's how changes always form, first comes form and then comes the content.

But I think it would be better if he just put less fantasy and more life into it. Americans in Europe? She was certainly killed socially by a combination of all of those, but she was killed also by her own indiffernce to what people thought of her. This novella, written in , seeks to explore the interplay of social norms between Europe and America.

Like many "great writers" in the late 19th Century, James' most popula "She seemed to him, in all this, an extraordinary mixture of innocence and crudity. Like many "great writers" in the late 19th Century, James' most popular novels are often his shorter one. It was cleanly written and intriguing. While I would always prefer to have money than not.

I'm pretty sure to be an upper-class woman in the late Victorian period certainly must have sucked that being said, being a lower-class woman in the s wasn't a stroll in a Roman park either.

Just look at Tolstoy's novella The Kreutzer Sonata pub. Both James and Tolstoy seem fixated on propriaty and women's place. Tolstoy was more interested in preaching and James was more interested in understanding, but still it was weird to read them so close together.

I need to read about Wonder Woman next, or something where a woman isn't being judged by men and society beacuse she walks with an Italian or plays piano with a violinist. As a member of the proletariat, I should not enjoy a book concerni "I'm very fond of society, and I have always had a great deal of it. As a member of the proletariat, I should not enjoy a book concerning the exploits of the idle rich, but like The Great Gatsby , good writing can make all the difference.

There's not much to this brief novel, and the obsession with manners and public behavior reminded me quite a bit of Colette 's work. Still, it was eminently readable, and undoubtedly a good introduction to James' oeuvre. View all 3 comments. I have not read many of Henry James' works to date and am slowly adding some to my list. Today was time for Daisy Miller, originally published in This is really a novella, the story of a young woman seeing the Continent with her mother and young brother and catching the eye of one Mr.

Winterbourne, an American who resides in Europe.

James himself is present as narrator occasionally to exclaim in some way on the activity or thoughts of his characters. The young woman is Daily Miller from New I have not read many of Henry James' works to date and am slowly adding some to my list. The young woman is Daily Miller from New York state.

Daisy Miller (Dover Thrift Editions)

She remarks upon her visits to New York City but her desire for large venues has led to this trip abroad. She is an enigma to Winterbourne who is puzzled by her behavior. She flirts as Americans do but she seems without guile.

But she tempts the disapproval of the fashionable who she would court by her wish to be independent, particularly in her assignations with men. She prefers what will be 20th century behaviors but it is not yet time. And it may not yet be time even at home in America.

By the end of this work, Daisy has received her final comeuppance for her "behavior" on the Continent, behavior deemed not quite right by those who are in the know, both European and Americans abroad. Is it innocence or not caring to conform that leads her on her own path? Is she as gullible as she seems to try to paint herself or does she want the best of all worlds: I'm not sure exactly where I put her on this scale, but it seems the Puritan gods have had their say in the end.

Precisamente es el misterio que envuelve a su encantadora protagonista lo que hace de Daisy Miller un relato tan provocador. James crafts beautiful sentences with a lot of description and semicolons. His nickname is "The Master" and you can see why. Not much happens in a James narrative, but I love 19th century literature formalities and all so he's always been a favorite of mine.

The narrative follows a young American man, Winterbourne, as he observes and critiques a young American woman--Daisy Miller--through their brief acquanta If you haven't read Henry James, I would recommend Daisy Miller over the longer works. The narrative follows a young American man, Winterbourne, as he observes and critiques a young American woman--Daisy Miller--through their brief acquantanceship.

You get to see all the basic elements of James at play but without the page fatigue. And, if you do fall in love with his writing, there's loads more. Apr 25, Exina rated it really liked it Shelves: Required reading for American literature seminar. A very interesting story; I enjoyed this one.

I like a lady to be exclusive; I'm dying to be exclusive myself. View 2 comments. Feb 25, Ivana Books Are Magic rated it really liked it. I would say that Daisy Miller is a great introduction to Henry James. This book is not only shorter, but also less complex than other works of his that I have read.

However, it bears a close resemblance to his novels and explores similar themes. Having previously read The Portrait of a Lady, I found it hard not to compare the two. Daisy Miller was, if I recall well, James' first commercial literary success. Anyhow, I came to this novella with high expectations, but I wasn't disappointed. One could argue that travel always makes us compare and reevaluate things, and while we are about it, perhaps we could also add that travelling can make us learn something about ourselves?

Youth is all about trying to discover who we are. In addition, when one is young, everything can feel like a discovery. If one wants to write a novel that comments on society, a young woman always makes for a good protagonist. Because society is especially diligent when it comes to paying attention to young ladies.

This attention is not always a positive one, indeed, our society can be quite judgemental when it comes to young women. The relationship between our social and individual identity is always an interesting subject.

Henry James excels at portraying the society and emphasizing the social pressure on individual. In this novel James compares and contrasts American and European society on more levels than one.

The novel opens up in Switzerland with Daisy meeting a fellow American Fredrick, who falls in love with her shortly. Daisy is not approved of by his aunt. Fredrick seems to be uncertain of his views of Daisy, but remains attracted to her. They socialize and spend some time together, but eventually Fredrick has to leave Daisy who invites him to visit her in Rome. They do meet in Rome, but there Daisy has made a new friend, a young Italian man nobody seems to approve of.

I would lie if I said that I cared deeply about what happened to Daisy. I cared, but not that much, it was more a feeling of detachment than indifference.

Was Daisy provocative or was she just stubborn? Was she daring or was she just a flirt? Perhaps this decision only makes sense considering the length and the organization of the book. Speaking of the plot and the narrative, the ending was somewhat abrupt, but perhaps only more powerful because of that.

James' prose flows as beautifully as ever. His sentences are elegant and well crafted, his social observations clever and to the point. Is it enough? Quite frankly, for me it is. This novella was a wonderful read. It lacked the depth and the complexity of A Portrait Of a lady, but it makes for a lovely read.

The story is somewhat predictable, yet by the time I finished reading this novella, I was glad I read it. It sure wasn't a wasted effort. Daisy Miller was easy to read, an enjoyable book with enough food for the thought. I would recommend it to all fans of Henry James as well as those who want to read more of him but lack the time or the motivation to tackle his longer works.

But if you'd ask me now about the inimitable Daisy, I would demur. She's a little too coy and flirtatious for me. In fact, I find Henry James just a little too annoyingly clever in this novella. Or was it cleverly annoying? I couldn't make up my mind whether it was his cleverness that annoyed me more I once revelled in the melodrama of it all.

Now, I look at it and see only an artist's sketch of a later masterpiece. This, to me, is James-The-Apprentice, working out his angst on the then-modern-woman; working out his feelings on the sensibility split between European and American ideals; working it all out, in fact, like a young artist with his first set of coloured pencils: The brickbat that came sailing through the window at one point made me realize the heavy-handedness of the youngish artist that I had not noticed before.

Ostensibly describing Daisy, he is of course reflecting on America itself in the following passage: Winterbourne wondered how she felt about all the cold shoulders that were turned toward her, and sometimes it annoyed him to suspect that she did not feel it at all.

He said to himself that she was too light and childish, too uncultivated and unreasoning, too provincial, to have reflected upon her ostracism, or even to have perceived it. The at other moments he believed she carried about in her elegant and irresponsible little organism a defiant, passionate, perfectly observant consciousness of the impression she produced.

He asked himself whether Daisy's defiance came from the consciousness of innocence, or from her being, essentially, a young person of the reckless class.

It must be admitted that holding one's self to a belief in Daisy's "innocence" came to seem to Winterbourne more and more a matter of fine-spun gallantry.

As I have already had occasion to relate, he was angry at finding himself reduced to chopping logic about this young lady; he was vexed at this want of instinctive certitude as to how far her eccentricities were generic, national, and how far they were personal. And then it seems all a bit ho hum, because I ask myself As I make my way through James's oeuvre once again, I'm finding a lot of these artist's sketches, in fact, and I'm surprised that I didn't pay attention to them in quite the same way the first time 'round.

The grand master is a bit tarnished in my eyes, of late, not so much because his major works don't deserve great merit -- but that all the minor works are Too much has been made of them, unreasonably.

There's too much of working, and reworking, the same theme, with the same characters. They come to me now as cardboard cutouts -- paper dolls -- where one simply adorns the characters with new outfits and a new European city but they live the same lives as their predecessors, agonize over the same things in the old familiar way, and often come to the same resolution in exactly the same way.

James's characters have become a bit of a blur in my mind, in the way that Dickens's, or Hardy's, or Eliot's do not.

While each writer, admittedly, works on familiar, comfortable themes repeatedly, their characters are uniquely memorable in all their works. With James, I'm finding that only his major works "work" for me. And so, the halo is tarnished, after all. How to make this book better: Winterbourne meets Daisy Miller and decides he does not like her.

He returns home. View all 11 comments. Jul 12, Yulia rated it liked it. View 1 comment. Apr 05, James rated it it was amazing Shelves: I loved this book, in less than 90 pages, a wonderfully understated tragedy unfolds, society is judged and found wanting in a way that resonates today.

In Daisy Miller, a young woman has her every move dissected by a hovering society unwilling to ascribe anything but the most base of motives to behavior that falls out of their norms. The norms defined by the late 19th century may seem ridiculously stifling to our modern eye, but I would argue that these norms have been eased, replaced but not re I loved this book, in less than 90 pages, a wonderfully understated tragedy unfolds, society is judged and found wanting in a way that resonates today.

Daisy Miller Reader’s Guide

The norms defined by the late 19th century may seem ridiculously stifling to our modern eye, but I would argue that these norms have been eased, replaced but not removed, particularly if you are a young woman. Reading the other reviews my reaction seems to be a highly individual interpretation. In particular, the lack of consensus on Daisy Miller as a hero of her time, and not some flibbigibbert seemed really odd to me.

As a teenager I once tried to read a Henry James only to be driven off by the dryness and verbosity. I also was further discouraged by his preface to the book which is written with a rather glorious use of synonyms and a word count that seemed to bode ill.

While it's not quite as catchy as Cyndi Lauper's girls just wanna have fun, the dry understated style adds tremendously to the story. Feb 02, Erin rated it it was ok Shelves: Other than that, I really don't have anything to add. I wanted to like this novella more than I did. The writing is lovely but the character of Daisy Miller is so annoying that I wanted to either lecture her or throttle her preferably the latter.

She is nothing but a vexing, silly flirt -- she has no redeemable qualities. I plan to read more Henry James novels this year, and I hope I won't have such a negative reaction to his other female characters. Una civetta o una ragazza per bene?

E' poco seria o anticonformista? Frivola o spensierata? Leggera o istintiva? Zoccola si direbbe oggi o semplicemente libera e emancipata? Cosa significa essere una ragazza per bene? Sfortunatamente i costumi sociali non sono uguali in ogni luogo, in ogni tempo e in ogni cultura e ognuno di noi lo sa bene.

Daisy non fa nulla di male. Ma nonostante scorra velocissimo come fosse una storia banale e leggera, ha invece un significato e un razionale importante e molto ben definito. Oggi fortunatamente i costumi sono abbastanza cambiati, anche se ancora troppo spesso sento apostrofare impropriamente come zoccola specie dalle nuove generazioni una donna che si veste in un certo modo o che ha un comportamento critico o spiacevole.

Mi domando: Okay I picked this up because, with only three discs, it was the shortest audiobook I could find at the library and I wanted something brief for a shortened week of commuting. I had never read Daisy Miller, not heard much about it, and I hardly feel much like discussing it now that it's over. It bored the crap out of my kid, which goes to show that none of us have any appreciation for classic literature these days.

Reading this felt a lot like being back in high school english class. The languag Okay I picked this up because, with only three discs, it was the shortest audiobook I could find at the library and I wanted something brief for a shortened week of commuting. The language is simple, so the book is really accessible.

This was perfect for an audiobook on my commute. It's easy to get lost in fancy sentence structure when you're dodging semi-trucks on a major interstate in the rain. Daisy Miller is an American tourist, traveling around Europe with her mother and young brother.

She is acquainted with several Americans also living in Europe, but her flirtatious manner toward men is totally unbecoming to her social station and reveals her as a terribly uninformed, ignorant American flirt. She is young and having a good time and behaves irreverently toward the more conservative social conventions. Daisy Miller is something of a spitfire in a totally tedious and ignorant sort of way, defying convention, refusing to cowtow to elitism and perception, and rejecting the idea that she should "behave" in a "ladylike manner," so maybe we could like her for her resilient and resistant spirit, like a zygotic feminist.

I mean, usually I do side with that kind of girl. But Daisy Miller is simpering, manipulative and she whines so much, it was absolutely impossible for me to feel sympathy for her or her bad social graces or her untimely death. She was so very unlikable, as were all of the characters, and at the end of the book I wasn't left with any sort of grand allegorical insght.

Dec 15, George K. Mar 20, Dolors rated it liked it Shelves: A short story which deals, as many other novels by James, with the changing role of women in Society and the differences that begun to arise between the old stiff Europe and the America at the end of the XIXth century.

Daisy Miller is not like any other heroine of the time, she speaks her mind, defies the imposed roles of propriety and goes unchaperoned with as many gentlemen as she chooses to. Her transparent ways might have found a true companion in the sophisticated American Mr. Winterbourne, A short story which deals, as many other novels by James, with the changing role of women in Society and the differences that begun to arise between the old stiff Europe and the America at the end of the XIXth century.

Winterbourne, but his classical ways and a social disadjustment prevents them from a happy ending. As usual, Henry James presents his feminine character as a limited creature; innocent, stupid and flirtatious.

Her lack of intelligence brings her to a fateful destiny which seems to be exposed as a lesson to be learnt for all of us who belong to the "weaker" sex. The novel could also be regarded as a cynical account of a decaying society and its hypocritical members. Anyway, I found it preposterous, simple - minded and unidimensional.

Essentially, however, he is waiting for something else. How would you describe Winterbourne and why do you think he is susceptible to Daisy? Is he an honest man? How does his surname fit into James?

Does James present Giovanelli as a complicated, fully imagined character, or is Giovanelli merely the proverbial mysterious stranger? Does James explore Giovanelli? What attracts Daisy to Giovanelli? Is this attraction plausible? Why at the end of the novel does he say,? If she had lived I should have got nothing. She never would have married me?? What do you make of Daisy? Why do you think James set the novel? Share on Facebook. Add to Cart. Learn More About Daisy Miller print.

LitFlash The eBooks you want at the lowest prices. Read it Forward Read it first. Pass it on! Stay in Touch Sign up. We are experiencing technical difficulties.They do meet in Rome, but there Daisy has made a new friend, a young Italian man nobody seems to approve of. I'm no grammar nazi, but this was distractingly bad. The norms defined by the late 19th century may seem ridiculously stifling to our modern eye, but I would argue that these norms have been eased, replaced but not re I loved this book, in less than 90 pages, a wonderfully understated tragedy unfolds, society is judged and found wanting in a way that resonates today.

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